Texas Hits a New Low. Even for Texas.

By: Monday September 9, 2013 7:15 pm

Hornet Signs of Waco, Texas came up with this really tasteful truck decal of a bound woman in the truck bed.

 

Differences Matter – Wage and Wealth Gap for Single Mothers of Color

By: Sunday August 18, 2013 6:30 pm

Three years ago I found myself closing the chapter on my marriage. I did this against the advice of my friends who tried persuading me to stay for the children, for the sake of security and until I finished my studies. I had spent 10 years in an unsatisfying marriage and the thought of one more day for the sake of something/somebody else just was not acceptable. I left the marriage and while the emotional release was satisfying; but being independent and having to be responsible for my family was a reality I don’t think I fully grasped.

Late Night: In Which Rick Perry Continues to be a Tool

By: Monday July 8, 2013 8:00 pm

Not content to be publicly owned by Wendy Davis on the floor of the Texas legislature and all over the airwaves, Rick Perry again decides to nom his loafers.

Domestic Workers Sow a New Global Movement

By: Wednesday April 17, 2013 11:00 am

In Argentina and Brazil, a sector of workers that has long labored invisibly is moving out of the shadows and gaining legal protections. Their counterparts in Jamaica and Uruguay are sparking a new political consciousness from the friction between tradition and globalization. Around the world, private homes are becoming labor’s latest battleground as domestic workers stake out their rights.

Despite stretching into every region of the world, domestic work has historically been excluded from conventional labor laws, regardedly merely as “women’s work.” A breakthrough came in 2011 with the passage of the groundbreaking Convention 189 on domestic workers’ rights by the International Labour Organization (ILO), the UN special agency for labor rights. The convention lays out principles for fair treatment at work, including the right to a fair labor contract and a safe work environment, freedom from exploitation and coercion, and legal recourse against abusive employers.

Women Unionists of the Arab Spring Battle Two Foes: Sexism and Neoliberalism

By: Monday April 1, 2013 12:10 pm

Originally posted at In These Times

This year’s World Social Forum, a transnational gathering of social activists, took place in Tunis, a city bubbling with unrest as it struggles to shake off a legacy of authoritarian rule while navigating tensions over women’s rights, labor and nationalism. At the gates of the gathering last week, these faultlines became starkly apparent when a caravan of trade unionists and rights advocates found themselves unexpectedly blockaded. Border police, under official orders, refused entry to a delegation of 96 Algerian activists that included members of the embattled union SNAPAP, known for its militancy and inclusion of women as leaders and front-line protesters.

Is Gender Justice Getting Shafted in Immigration Reform?

By: Wednesday March 27, 2013 1:05 pm

The politics of immigration touch upon major faultlines in American society: not just the legal boundary between citizen and foreigner, but also lines of race, class, nationality, culture and, increasingly, gender. Women, who make up about half of the U.S. immigrant population and an estimated 40 percent of undocumented adults, face unique challenges as migrants. However, gender issues have gone almost entirely unremarked in official immigration-reform talks–that is, until a Senate hearing last Monday, when Mee Moua, head of the Asian American Justice Center, seized an opportunity to call out the invisibility of women in the debate.

OK, all you women at the top: Zip it. Right NOW.

By: Saturday March 23, 2013 12:20 pm

we now have another in yet a seemingly endless stream of women from elite backgrounds, who are playing at the top of their respective games, who are telling other women a) how to live their home and work lives, and b) that they are not trying hard enough. This one is from Katharine Weymouth, who is the publisher, chief executive, and heir of The Washington Post.

After Steubenville – Don McPherson, Former NFL Player, on Toxic Masculinity

By: Tuesday March 19, 2013 4:25 pm

There has been a lot of worthy essays written about this topic, but this effort caught my eye — “Former NFL quarterback Don McPherson challenges media response to Steubenville verdict,” part of human rights group Breakthrough’s One Million Men, a campaign to engage men to end violence against women around the world. It was unreal to see the rape culture-affirming coverage by the media (Candy Crowley and Poppy Harlow of CNN’s coverage come to mind, sadly), that went on and on about the destroyed lives of the convicted rapists, forgetting the victim here is the girl who they violated.

FDL Book Salon Welcomes Donald Tomaskovic-Devey, Documenting Desegregation: Racial and Gender Segregation in Private-Sector Employment Since the Civil Rights Act

By: Sunday January 27, 2013 1:59 pm

The authors amass an extraordinary amount of detail in presenting their conclusions as they examine variations by region, business and decade. They consider some of the background developments comparing expanding industries with contracting ones, and new firms with old ones, showing that such factors vary in importance depending on the industry, the time period, and the impact on racial versus gender segregation.

They also provide in depth comparisons of the firms large enough to be covered by federal civil rights laws versus those exempted, and the varying effectiveness of EEOC enforcement against large firms versus oversight of federal contractors. The result provides a wealth of data for anyone interested in either the trajectory of racial and gender equality in the workplace or the effectiveness of enforcement efforts.

FDL Movie Night: Kings Point

By: Monday December 17, 2012 5:00 pm

Growing old, something we all face. Growing old in the New York of the 1970′s where

“Life wasn’t so beautiful and the winters were cold”

created a diaspora to Florida–over half a million people over 55 moved to Florida from 1975 to 1980, according to the Census Bureau. In Delray Beach an enterprising developer created a seemingly idyllic community of two-story stucco buildings surrounded by tropical plants, with swimming pools, shuffleboard courts, and recreation halls. They named it Kings Point. The down payment was $1,500, slightly more for a second story unit since supposedly the bugs couldn’t get in. (In a stunning oversight, there are no elevators!)

SUPPORT FIREDOGLAKE
Follow Firedoglake
TODAY’S TOP POSTS
CSM Ads advertisement
Advertisement