The CIA, Senate Intelligence Committee & the Culture of Impunity for Torture

By: Tuesday March 11, 2014 4:15 pm

The remarks, which Senator Dianne Feinstein delivered on the floor of the Senate, was one of the more significant statements given by a United States senator in recent history. They clarified the extent to which the Central Intelligence Agency has worked to interfere and even intimidate senators and their staff, as they have worked to complete and finalize a study on the agency’s rendition, detention and interrogation program that involved torture.

More on the Press and the Question of Torture in the Army Field Manual

By: Thursday January 16, 2014 6:47 am

“Torture is immoral under all circumstances.  It represents an extreme and shocking form of violating the human person.  Like slavery, genocide and rape, it is never justified.”

At Cheney Roast, Torture And Libby Case Get Laughs

By: Wednesday October 9, 2013 11:20 am

Former Vice President Dick Cheney was honored at the luxurious Plaza Hotel in Manhattan in a roast organized by Commentary magazine. The event was sponsored by Hedge Fund managers with John Podhoretz of Commentary emceeing. The roasters were Donald Rumsfeld, Michael Mukasey, Joe Lieberman, and Scooter Libby.

Japanese WWII Torture Document Eerily Reminiscent of US Torture Program

By: Thursday August 15, 2013 5:55 am

The is taken from a 63 year old book published in the early days of the Cold War. Titled Materials on the Trial of Former Serviceman of the Japanese Army Charged with Manufacturing and Employing Bacteriological Weapons (Foreign Languages Publishing House, Moscow, 1950), the book contains trial summaries and testimony from the Khabarovsk war crimes trial in December 1949.

Report on US Torture and Rendition to Libya Details New Waterboarding Claims

By: Thursday September 6, 2012 6:45 am

Human Rights Watch (HRW) has released a major new report detailing how the Bush Administration and other allied governments tortured and imprisoned opponents of former Libyan dictator Muammar Gaddafi. The prisoners were then rendered to Gaddafi’s own prisons where many of them were tortured.

Is Justice Possible?

By: Saturday May 12, 2012 9:00 am

Is it possible for Khalid Shaikh Mohammed (KSM), his co-defendants and the victims of their alleged crimes to receive justice? Can their torture and harsh conditions of confinement be ignored at the defendants’ trial? The Obama administration answers both questions affirmatively. The chief prosecutor at the “Military Commission” hearing stated, “The remedy for torture … is not to just dismiss all charges…” He continued, “[I]t doesn’t pass the common sense test that everything … is polluted and tainted by an instance of torture[.] That means everybody goes free?

That’s not justice.”

Dissenting Torture Memo Bush Administration Tried to Destroy Is Released

By: Wednesday April 4, 2012 9:20 am

A State Department internal memo opposing the Justice Department’s arguments for CIA “enhanced interrogation techniques”—torture—has been released. The memo from February 2006 was written by Philip Zelikow, then counselor to Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice. It was believed that all copies of the memo had been destroyed, but on April 3, the National Security Archive, obtained a copy through a FOIA request and posted it online.

US Government Argues Cables on Illegal CIA Waterboarding Should Remain Secret

By: Thursday March 8, 2012 1:35 pm

As part of a follow-up from the CIA’s destruction of torture videotapes, the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) has been working to force the CIA to release cables that describe how the agency used waterboarding. The asserts the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) lawsuit should not induce the release of documents because waterboarding involves “intelligence methods” that should not be revealed. But, the ACLU disputes that argument and points out waterboarding is illegal so the cables should not be protected from release.

FDL Book Salon Welcomes Joshua E. S. Phillips, None of Us Were Like This Before: American Soldiers and Torture

By: Saturday February 18, 2012 1:59 pm

The Iraq war isn’t over. For tens of thousands of soldiers returning from the battlefield, it never will be. Some of these men and women will turn to alcohol and drugs to ease their mental injuries; some will end up homeless, unemployed and divorced. Some will commit suicide. Most will be forgotten.

That will be one of the lasting legacies of the nearly nine-year-long conflict.

Fortunately, there are investigative journalists like Joshua Phillips who have taken great pains to preserve the memories of veterans whose lives have been ravaged—and cut short—by the wars.

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Upcoming FDL Book Salons

Saturday, April 19, 2014
2:00 pm Pacific
Poison Candy: The Murderous Madam: Inside Dalia Dippolito’s Plot to Kill
Chat with Mark Ebner about his new book. Hosted by Beth Karas.

Sunday, April 20, 2014
2:00 pm Pacific
The Gulf of Tonkin Events – Fifty Years Later: A Footnote to the History of the Vietnam War
Chat with John White about his new book. Hosted by Pulitzer Prize winner Deborah J. Nelson.

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