Former Swedish Prosecutor Urges Termination of Julian Assange Case

By: Sunday January 12, 2014 6:30 pm

A former Swedish prosecutor has written an op-ed for the newspaper Svenska Dagbladet, where he suggests the country’s office in charge of pursuing the case against WikiLeaks editor-in-chief Julian Assange terminate it entirely.

Boeing and NSA Get Schooled, Brazil Edition

By: Saturday December 21, 2013 9:15 am

Remember high school?

The kid on the outside wants to be part of the cool group, and one of the insiders starts to show some interest in the outsider. “Will you . . .” asks the insider, and the outsider waffles. “Once you start hanging out with me, folks will think you’re at least as cool as that other semi-cool kid . . . and maybe cooler” says the insider, and still the outsider waffles. Then word get out about the things the insider has been doing behind the outsider’s back, and the outsider sees how that other semi-cool kid gets treated better. And still the cool kid asks “Will you . . .” At this point in the story, you know what happens next: the outsider looks for a way to get back.

Which brings us to Brazil and Boeing . . .

Who Started the Fires in Sweden?

By: Saturday June 22, 2013 4:00 pm

One evening in May, a modest Scandinavian suburb caught on fire. Images streaming out of Husby, just outside Stockholm, overlaid the Nordic socialist wonderland with a scene straight out of Watts circa 1965 – sidewalks strewn with charred cars, shattered glass and angry kids. For days, the riots bled across the region and jarred international observers who tend to associate Sweden with modular furniture rather than youth mobs. But the most shocked might have been Husby’s own neighbors, who had been resolutely ignoring the social fissures roiling next door before they exploded in the headlines.

The “disturbance” was sparked by a police confrontation on May 14 that led to the shooting death of a 69-year old immigrant man, reportedly armed with a knife.

Come Saturday Morning: Why Are Swedish Newspapers Thriving While US Ones Aren’t?

By: Saturday February 2, 2013 6:45 am

Towards the end of a March 17, 2012 speech at the Left Forum at New York City’s Pace University, Michael Moore made the interesting assertion that, unlike in the United States, Sweden’s newspapers were not only surviving, but thriving. The reason he gave for this was that Swedish newspapers depended more on circulation than advertising for their revenue.

I couldn’t help being intrigued by this, so I decided to do a little digging.

Obama’s Embrace of Rendition & the Appearance of Three Men with Somali Roots in Federal Court

By: Wednesday January 2, 2013 9:50 am

The three men picked up in Somalia are wanted for fighting in a group that the US has designated as a “terrorist organization” against forces backed by the US. There is no evidence of the time that they plotted any attacks or were coming to America with al-Shabaab fighters intent on carrying out some kind of nefarious plot. This means a court is going to try and prosecute these men essentially for being on what the US government considers to be the wrong side of a conflict in Somalia.

Julian Assange Delivers Speech Thanking Supporters, Calling for End to US War on Whistleblowers

By: Sunday August 19, 2012 8:30 am

Julian Assange, the WikiLeaks editor-in-chief who was granted asylum earlier on August 16, delivered a speech from the balcony of the Ecuador embassy in London, where he has been holed up for two months. The speech was an opportunity for Assange to show gratitude toward his supporters while also reminding the world of what he sees the United States doing to not only go after whistleblowers but also target dissent.

How Coverage of Julian Assange Provokes Liberal Outrage

By: Saturday August 18, 2012 4:00 pm

Most liberals in the United States seem to prefer ignoring what is happening with WikiLeaks, particularly its founder and editor-in-chief Julian Assange. Either they are totally repulsed by Assange as an individual, they do not consider WikiLeaks to have provided a valuable service by releasing previously classified documents, the way the United States government is pursuing WikiLeaks founders, owners, managers, staffers and others connected doesn’t bother them or the story at this point is so complicated that they do not have the patience to sort out all the details to figure out the truth.

These various viewpoints inevitably lead to a contention that the era of WikiLeaks is over and, perhaps, the organization never really mattered that much at all.

Julian Assange’s Fears About Extradition to the United States Affirmed

By: Friday August 17, 2012 10:28 am

How do supporters of WikiLeaks founder and editor-in-chief Julian Assange make the leap that he is more likely to be extradited to the United States from Sweden than the United Kingdom? That is a common question and, certainly, a key question for anyone who remains skeptical of whether Assange should have been granted asylum by Ecuador.

What the New York Times Won’t Tell You About Julian Assange

By: Thursday August 16, 2012 11:28 am

I challenge you, dear reader, to go over this NYT hit piece on Julian Assange and see if any mention is made of the following key and pertinent facts.

Coppers, Diplomatic Police, and Cabbies at Ecuadorian Embassy, All for Assange

By: Thursday August 16, 2012 4:35 am

Police surround the Ecuadorian embassy in London, preparing, or at least trying, to arrest Julian Assange on violation of his bail, as he has not checked in with the court in over a month. But of course if he left the embassy to check in, he’d be nabbed and extradited to Sweden to deal with accusations of rape, and possibly then extradited to the U.S. where he’d be up against far more serious charge–like life and death charges–of espionage over WikiLeaks.

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