Big Data Meets Civic Engagement

By: Saturday May 3, 2014 12:59 pm

An effort like this seems very important to me – the “wait until it fails” model of regulation doesn’t seem like a winner, and I’d like to see other examples highlighted. They are buried in data, though, and ferreting them out requires new tools and new talents. Activists take note.

 

Anti-Prohibition Is Not Pro-Pot: Voters Want Marijuana Regulation

By: Tuesday March 4, 2014 4:13 pm

Popular opinion is trending towards making marijuana legal for adults but controlled. Its use by adults should simply be legally tolerated not promoted. The country is simply turning against the policy of prohibition.

West Virginians Still Need Water After Coal Chemical Spill

By: Tuesday January 21, 2014 5:46 pm

So little is known about 4-MCHM that regulators didn’t even know it’s boiling point. Now scientists are scrambling to find out how the chemical reacts with the chlorine in the municipal water system, and whether the chemical has leached into water heaters and water pipes in people’s homes. Authorities recommend that all pipes that have come in contact with the pollutant be flushed, including water heaters and outdoor faucets.

However, West Virginia American Water, the company that owns the water treatment facility contaminated by the coal chemical, is only offering a 10 dollar credit (1000 gallons) to consumers. The cost of flushing homes will therefore fall on already struggling West Virginians.

The Incredible Shrinking Internet

By: Saturday September 28, 2013 7:40 pm

A couple of weeks ago, Yves Smith’s link roundup included a McClatchy piece about consumers dropping cable TV. She remarked: “Trust me, when you seem more consumers ditching cable, you’ll see the pipeline providers start charging based on how much you download a month.” Caps really aren’t necessary, though; connections are already capped by speed. You can’t download any more than the connection will allow. Consumers should be able to buy a connection at a set price, and the ISP should charge for it based on how much data it could transmit. Charge more for faster speeds, less for slower ones.

FDL Movie Night: Money for Nothing: Inside the Federal Reserve

By: Monday September 23, 2013 4:59 pm

The Federal Reserve is a hundred years old this year. There’s not a whole lot to celebrate in its century long history–the intention might have been good, but the execution has kind of been disastrous. In tonight’s film, Money for Nothing: Inside the Federal Reserve, our guest filmmaker Jim Bruce takes us through the history of the Federal Reserve System and into the current mess.

OH Department of Natural Resources Meets With Public on Nelson Wells

By: Saturday June 8, 2013 6:40 pm

Last summer the Ohio Department of Natural Resources (ODNR) announced plans to approve seven toxic fracking waste injection wells for a single site in our county. Many citizens were alarmed by this, and at the time I posted on some of our fruitless attempts to get ODNR (in the person of geologist Tom Tomastik) to have a public hearing during the comment period. Instead we were promised an informational meeting at some point.

ODNR finally held it this last Thursday – nine months later, and about a 50 minute drive from the community where the wells will be permitted.

Wall Street Lobbyists Literally Writing Bills in Congress

By: Monday May 27, 2013 12:10 pm

I try to be cynical, but I can’t keep up.

Conservative Appeals Court Judges Think All Economic Regulation Should Be Unconstitutional

By: Monday April 16, 2012 12:40 pm

An unusually blunt ruling from two conservative federal judges, if applied at the Supreme Court level, would make virtually all regulation on businesses or financial firms unconstitutional. DC Circuit Court members David Sentelle (a Reagan appointee) and Janice Rogers Brown (an appointee of George W. Bush) wrote a concurring opinion in a case about regulation for the dairy industry, one that would rewrite several decades of legal history on the legislative powers of Congress.

Live Chat – William K. Black: The Foreclosure Settlement

By: Friday February 17, 2012 11:00 am

In the aftermath of the foreclosure fraud settlement, and as we look ahead to the working group on securities fraud co-chaired by Eric Schneiderman, one of the best people to look to for answers on how this whole thing could have gone – how it could still go – is William K. Black. The author of The Best Way to Rob a Bank is to Own One, and a central figure in exposing fraud among both financial executives and members of Congress during the S&L scandal, Black has been relentless on exposing the lax nature of regulation and prosecution during the past decade and more. His latest scoffed at the new task force on securitization fraud.

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