Report: Governors Engaging In Crony Capitalism Disguised As Economic Development

By: Wednesday October 23, 2013 9:41 am

In a new report, Good Jobs First details the growing use of “public-private partnerships” (PPPs) to promote economic development and the conflicts of interests they carry. Unlike traditional economic development which is run from a department of government (Commerce for example), PPPs allow private interests to borrow public authority to promote an economic agenda. Not surprisingly, that agenda often benefits the private interests that propose it. What was supposed to be a program for economic development quickly devolved into the most base form of government corruption and crony capitalism.

 

FDL Book Salon Welcomes Gar Alperovitz, What Then Must We Do?: Straight Talk About the Next American Revolution

By: Sunday May 12, 2013 1:59 pm

In What Then Must We Do?, political economy professor Gar Alperovitz slowly and deliberately nudges readers off the traditional course of political activism assumed to bring about progressive change – elections, legislative fights, protest actions, firing the twin engines of grassroots Democratic groups and organized labor – arguing that these methods have failed. He finds readers at that moment of despair, when the best efforts we’ve known to create the space for change have failed. Indeed, he doesn’t believe that these efforts can reverse what is now a decades-long march of structural economic, environmental and political decline. “Absent major national shocks,” he writes, “the capacity for fundamental political change is limited in the American context.”

Hurricane Sandy’s Legacy Could Be Ramp-Up of Privatization Efforts

By: Friday November 2, 2012 12:42 pm

Rebuilding the East Coast after Superstorm Sandy will be an expensive proposition. A new estimate of the cost of the storm now reaches $50 billion, and just protecting New York City from future disasters through the use of a seawall and other barriers would tack on another $15 billion, though that money would be as well spent as any you can devise. (It would also make far more economic sense than a campaign to “fix the debt”).

But anyone who watches the underrated HBO series Treme understands that, in the aftermath of a life-changing event like a hurricane and flood, the shock doctrine starts to factor in.

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