BushWatch: The Hubris, the Horror

By: Thursday January 15, 2009 1:33 pm

Someone responded yesterday to an AFL-CIO blog in which we mentioned that just days before leaving office, Bush got a whole new set of nearly $600,000 china for the White House. The fellow who commented was rightly appalled.

I don’t know about the rest of you who are reading this, but I am just barely making it the way it is.

Death and the Bush Administration

By: Thursday July 31, 2008 10:30 am

Last week, a confluence of events reminded the U.S. public that it’s not just the food we eat that’s increasingly dangerous in our daily lives—inadequate safety on the job still is killing America’s working people.

The week ended with two more deaths from construction cranes, this time in Illinois. These fatalities came within days of four deaths due to a crane collapse in Houston—and raises to 18 the number of workers who died from crane-related deaths so far this year, according to an estimate by The Wall Street Journal, which doesn’t include bystander deaths.

Electrocuted at Age 22

By: Thursday May 1, 2008 10:30 am

Every day, most of us go to work and then come home. Next day: Rinse, repeat.

But some U.S. workers go to work and never come home.

In April 2005, Donald Wilcher Smith was one of them. The 22-year-old central Texas man was electrocuted at the Sanderson Farms processing plant.

This week, his father, Donald Coit Smith, described what it’s like to lose his son.

I do not possess the capacity to adequately describe the horror that possesses my soul from my son’s death.

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