Late Night: Public Schools in New Orleans 1958-1959

By: Wednesday August 27, 2014 8:00 pm

New Orleans 1958

Cultural experiences abound in this land of ours, but none can surpass living in New Orleans for just one year. The mockingbirds singing in the magnolias were left behind in Atlanta, along with red dirt and Stone Mountain. Ray went ahead of the six of us to begin his year of duty in the New Orleans Public Health Service Hospital. He got established and rented a house before the kids and I loaded the car and followed to what we found to be a strange locale.

 

FDL Movie Night: Getting Back to Abnormal

By: Monday June 30, 2014 4:59 pm

Tonight’s documentary, Getting Back to Abnormal, dives into to the messy issues of race and politics in post-Katrina New Orleans. Our guests tonight–Producers/Directors Peter Odabashian, Paul Stekler and Andrew Kolker–tackle the subject by focusing on the pivotal 2010 city council race for District B. Incumbent Stacy Head, the first white Councilperson from District B in 31 years, was elected in 2006 and has faced charges of racism. Her opponent, Corey Watson is an African-American preacher and the son of a powerful pastor who has no problem telling his congregants that there is no separation between church and state because God owns them both.

Late Night: Hey Joe, All Things Being Equal

By: Tuesday March 18, 2014 8:00 pm

Tomorrow packs a double whammy: It’s the Feast of St Joseph–patron saint of confectioners, carpenters and cuckolds, along with fathers and real estate sales–and the Spring Equinox. St Joseph’s also the patron of saint of Sicily, and the Feast of St. Joseph’s Day is a big deal in New Orleans which has a large Sicilian/Italian population (muffalettas!). Altars are laid out with lemons for new love. Fava beans represent the drought in Sicily which ended after prayers to St. Joe statues of the Holy Family (plus additional saints if you’re so inclined) candles, flowers and food, with an emphasis on seafood, round out a traditional altar.

Late Night: Let Them Eat King Cake

By: Tuesday March 4, 2014 8:00 pm

Now that it’s Mardi Gras (or if you prefer Shrove Tuesday, or as IHOP is promoting it, National Pancake Day with free flapjacks til 10pm), we must put aside fleshy food and indulge in a meatless diet, unless you’re an atheist or a pagan. I never know what to give up for Lent, which is for me more cultural than spiritual. Maybe I won’t buy any—uh wool underwear? I’ll give up zucchini! Oh wait no, that’s not good because I loathe the zuke.

A Conversation With Scott Crow, Part 1: Occupy & Activism

By: Thursday February 13, 2014 6:59 pm

Scott Crow is a co-founder of the Common Ground Collective which provided grassroots solidarity and mutual aid after Hurricane Katrina. An anarchist activist, author and public speaker, he travels regularly to share his views. The second edition of his book about Common Ground, Black Flags and Windmills is due out soon. It’s one of multiple book-length projects in the works.

Both Scott & I call Austin home, so I invited him out for coffee and conversation on a recent break from an unusually chilly Central Texas winter.

FDL Movie Night: Informant

By: Monday September 30, 2013 4:59 pm

Informant follows the engrossing and disturbing story of Brandon Darby, the handsome, impassioned radical activist turned FBI informant and Tea Party hero whose work with the FBI led to one man’s death in Austin, Texas, and the trial and imprisonment of two anarchists during the 2008 Republican National Convention in Minneapolis-St. Paul. Our guest tonight, Director Jamie Meltzer, has crafted a taut tale with re-enactments that break the fourth wall, conflicting accounts of key incidents, and an unreliable, perhaps confabulist, narrator.

Occupy NOLA Has 2 Words for New Orleans Mayor Mitch Landrieu and the National Football League: Our Streets!

By: Saturday January 26, 2013 12:00 pm

Under the Clean Zone Ordinance and Guide established by the City of New Orleans, holding banners and signs with the above slogans in the Clean Zone during Super Bowl week would have been prohibited and punishable by a $500 fine and 6 months in jail.

Because no members of Occupy The Stage (or Occupy NOLA) are official NFL sponsors, and none of our proposed signs, flags, or banners contain any NFL branding, one of us asked the Court to intervene preenforcement and protect the First Amendment Rights of the citizens of New Orleans.

#Occupy Votes

By: Thursday November 8, 2012 4:01 pm

Since the Occupy movement began, many have attempted to position the group in opposition to electoral politics. Occupy in its purest form is nonpartisan, and since the beginning of the movement this has been a source of criticism.

If we want to really make a difference, we were told time and again, we should organize similarly to the Tea Party and begin to field candidates for office. When occupiers protested Mitt Romney or other hyper-conservative politicians, they’d be accused of being in bed with Barack Obama. If the movement protested neo-liberals like Obama, we were accused of being traitors to all that was good in the world because we obviously wanted Romney to win (Carnacing is not limited to blogs). Most of all, occupiers got accused of being disconnected from what their critics perceive to be real politics — we were lazy hippies who didn’t understand how the world works and worst of all we don’t vote.

End-of-Summer News Puts Nuclear Renaissance on Permanent Vacation

By: Sunday September 2, 2012 11:50 am

The Nuclear Regulatory Commission cannot issue a license for the construction and operation of a new nuclear reactor in Maryland–that is the ruling of the NRC’s Atomic Safety and Licensing Board (ASLB) handed down Thursday.

Michael Mariotte, Executive director of NIRS, called Thursday’s decision “a blow to the so-called ‘nuclear renaissance,’” noting that back in 2007, when permit requests were submitted for Calvert Cliffs 3, the project was considered the “flagship” of a coming fleet of new reactors. “Now,” said Mariotte, “it is a symbol or the deservedly failed revival of nuclear power in the US.”

A symbol, yes, but far from the only symbol.

Hurricane Isaac Makes Landfall, Will Pound Gulf Coast Region for Days

By: Wednesday August 29, 2012 2:12 pm

Hurricane Isaac has made landfall in Louisiana, but it is basically hovering over the Gulf Coast, moving very slowly. The slowness of the storm and the circulation of much of it over water means that it will probably continue for some time, which means days of rain and more flooding over a broad coastal region. Wind speeds have weakened to 75mph, but this is still a big, wet storm.

SUPPORT FIREDOGLAKE
Follow Firedoglake
TODAY’S TOP POSTS
CSM Ads advertisement
Advertisement