Celebrating Confederate History Month Isn’t Just for The South

By: Saturday April 12, 2014 9:14 am

Ah, the heritage of the Confederacy. The South may have surrendered at Appomattox, but the war continues to be fought — and not just in the South, and not just by southerners. But of course, that’s where we need to start…

Earlier this week, Virginia’s Democratic Governor Terry McAuliffe announced that he would not be issuing any kind of proclamation making April “Confederate History Month” in his state, unlike several of his recent Republican predecessors. Among certain parts of the citizenry, that did not go over well.

 

Marriage Equality, Nullification, and Impeachment, Missouri Edition

By: Saturday February 8, 2014 9:06 am

After the Supreme Court struck down DOMA in US v Windsor, same sex couples in states like Missouri that discriminate against them are treading through a maze of conflicting state and federal laws and regulations. In Missouri, Gov. Jay Nixon has issued an executive order to cut through this mess with respect to filing state taxes, and the Missouri GOP has reacted in very predictable ways.

Can you say “articles of impeachment”? Sure you can.

#Justice4Daisy RallyToday, Maryville Rape Victim Has Voice

By: Tuesday October 22, 2013 4:00 pm

Daisy Coleman’s assailant, Matthew Barnett then 17, is the grandson of Rex Barnett, who served as member of the Missouri House of Representatives from 1994 to 2002. Barnett was initially charged with sexual assault and endangering the welfare of a child, but two months later the charges were dropped. Jordan Zech, another senior, videotaped Barnett raping Daisy, and that video was passed around school. Zech was charged with exploitation of a minor. Those charges were dropped also and the video “disappeared.” One boy present that night was sentenced in juvenile court for his assault against Coleman’s then-13 year old friend.

Missouri GOP Loses Nullification Fight; Turns Against Their Own

By: Saturday September 14, 2013 9:07 am

The Republican party holds a veto-proof majority of seats in both houses of the Missouri state legislature, but they discovered this past week that “veto-proof” means you have to keep your whole caucus together. After weeks of criss-crossing the state, Democratic Governor Jay Nixon caused enough sanity to break out among the MO GOP that he turned back the attempts to override vetoes on two major GOP initiatives: taxes and guns.

The anger aimed at “the Flimsy 15″ has been amazing to behold. “Worthless!” and “Primary them” and “strip them of their committee chairs” and “Not another dime to the MO GOP!” Meanwhile, the democratic attorney general and candidate to replace the term-limited Jay Nixon, Chris Koster, has to be smiling. He’s heard those cries before, and it’s what led him to bolt the GOP back in 2007. If the Flimsy 15 are tired of the GOP, Koster might remind them of the letter he wrote, back in the day, to help them write their own departure letters.

Fifty Years After King’s Dream Speech, Nullification Keeps on Marching

By: Saturday August 24, 2013 9:00 am

Each time I read or hear Martin Luther King Jr’s “I Have a Dream” speech, a different piece leaps out at me. Today, as we come to the fiftieth anniversary of that speech, it’s this:

I have a dream that one day, down in Alabama, with its vicious racists, with its governor having his lips dripping with the words of “interposition” and “nullification” — one day right there in Alabama little black boys and black girls will be able to join hands with little white boys and white girls as sisters and brothers.

The language of nullification — the thought that state laws can trump federal laws — is still a part of our national lexicon, despite the fact that the Nullifiers lost the Civil War. Indeed, here in Missouri, it’s become a very large part of the state political conversation.

Come Saturday Morning: Adventures in Lawmaking

By: Saturday February 16, 2013 6:45 am

For your entertainment, you are asked to determine which bill pushed by a Republican state legislator is stupider: This one or this one?

The Lorraine Brown Case: Accountability for Fraudulent Document Preparers, Not the Banks Who Requested the Documents

By: Tuesday November 20, 2012 3:35 pm

The Justice Department has issued their formal press release in the plea arrangement with Lorraine Brown, the former President of fraudulent foreclosure document processor DocX, a division of LPS. Brown pleaded guilty to wire and mail fraud and faces five years in prison and up to $250,000 in fines, from what DoJ describes as “a six-year scheme to prepare and file more than 1 million fraudulently signed and notarized mortgage-related documents with property recorders’ offices throughout the United States.” She also acknowledged lying to the FBI and other federal regulators investigating the scheme.

Separately, the state of Missouri, which had previously indicted Brown in the same scheme, announced their own plea agreement with her on fraudulent and forged document filings in his state.

Founder of DocX/LPS Pleads Guilty in Federal Court

By: Tuesday November 20, 2012 3:15 pm

The Founder of DocX, which later changed its name to LPS, has pleaded GUILTY in US District Court for the Middle District of Florida. In the “Factual Basis” document attached to her Plea Agreement, Lorraine Borwn, the founder of DocX, LLC, admits that the documents produced by these companies from the period 2003-2009 were forgeries.

Late Night: Medicine in a Rural Farming Community in 1920s Missouri

By: Saturday November 10, 2012 8:00 pm

Medicine in the 1920s was extremely crude, and death was always so close. In our fatalistic view, life and death were a lot closer than they are now. Infection from an injury like the one my mother suffered could kill as easily as not. The cure for everything at the time was gasoline. On the heels of war and a pandemic flu so severe that we still study it today, we were in a position at that time of being extremely poor combined with a lack of medicine. People never thought of death as a strangeness.

Todd Akin’s Way With Words Continues

By: Monday October 22, 2012 4:15 pm

But at least Representative Todd Akin, the son of his mother, father of his daughters, husband of his wife, and pious Christian that he is, didn’t call Senator Claire McCaskill a bitch.

‘Cause that would be downright ungentlemanly.

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