Dream Defenders Bring Us Blacked Out History Month

By: Friday February 28, 2014 3:20 pm

Since their inception this past Summer, The Dream Defenders quickly emerged as a force to be reckoned with.

Formed in Florida, the group came to prominence during the Zimmerman trial with their fierce advocacy against Stand Your Ground Laws, captivating a mainstream audience with their boldness and refusal to back down. The group consists of young people advocating on their own behalf. They’re scrappy, insistent and they have a lot of heart– characteristics that they’re not shy about displaying. Thinking big and organizing with an emphasis on solidarity and our shared struggle it’s hard not to feel better about the state of the world simply knowing they exist.

 

Peter LaBarbera Claims Martin Luther King, Jr Was Anti-Gay

By: Tuesday January 21, 2014 4:25 pm

And I have a feeling that if King had been alive during the birth of the modern lgbt equality movement, he would have been recognized the inherent goodness of our cause – to have ourselves and our families be treated equally under the law – and would have spoken in favor of our cause.

Snowden, Merkel, Obama, and King’s “Letter from Birmingham Jail”

By: Monday January 20, 2014 3:21 pm

President Obama has said that Martin Luther King Jr’s “Letter from Birmingham Jail” is a favorite of his, but again and again, he seems not to understand what King was saying.

Edward Snowden and Angela Merkel are giving him an opportunity to reread it and try once more to get the point.

Martin Luther King Jr., COINTELPRO and the Normalization of Bulk Surveillance in Post-9/11 America

By: Monday January 20, 2014 11:15 am

The political intelligence program known as COINTELPRO was used by FBI director J. Edgar Hoover to target civil rights leader, Martin Luther King, Jr. COINTELPRO moved “from the kid with a bomb to the kid with a picket sign, and from the kid with the picket sign to the kid with the bumper sticker of the opposing candidate.” It would keep “going down the line,” according to Tom Charles Huston, former aide to President Richard Nixon.

The Repetition Compulsion for War — and How It Might Fail This Time

By: Monday September 9, 2013 5:45 am

No matter how many times we’ve seen it before, the frenzy for launching a military attack on another country is — to the extent we’re not numb — profoundly upsetting. Tanked up with talking points in Washington, top officials drive policy while intoxicated with what Martin Luther King Jr. called “the madness of militarism,” and most media coverage becomes similarly unhinged. That’s where we are now.

Gay Presence at 50th Anniversary of 1963 March on Washington

By: Thursday August 29, 2013 2:00 pm

This is just too awesome for words. GLSEN’s Executive Director, Eliza Byard speaks at the 50th Anniversary of the March on Washington. In 1963, folks weren’t even talking about gay equality. Now we have a place at the table at this momentous event.

Fifty Years Ago: The Music of the March on Washington Rally

By: Wednesday August 28, 2013 6:52 pm

Songs give people the ability to muster the courage to dissent and keep on struggling for freedom and justice. They were part of the fabric of the civil rights movement. The importance of music is why musical performances at the March on Washington demonstration were necessary.

“Without the songs of the movement, personally I believe that there wouldn’t have been a movement,” Rutha Mae Harris, one of the original Freedom Singers, told NPR. “We needed those songs to help us not to be fearful when we were doing marches, or doing picket lines. And you needed a calming agent, and that’s what those songs were for us.”

MLK Jr. on ‘Meet the Press’ Before March on Washington: How Little Views of Dissent Have Changed in Press

By: Sunday August 25, 2013 12:30 pm

Three days before the March on Washington in 1963, the NBC news program, “Meet the Press,” had Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. and executive secretary of the NAACP, Roy Wilkins, on the show to answer questions by a panel of white male journalists.

Washington Bureau Chief of the Nashville Banner, Frank van der Linden, NBC News White House correspondent Robert MacNeil, Cowles Newspaper Publications’ Richard Wilson and “Meet the Press” permanent member and co-creator Lawrence Spivak all appeared and neither of the panelists were supportive of the plans by civil rights groups to take action in a large-scale march in Washington, DC.

FDL Book Salon Welcomes William P. Jones, The March on Washington: Jobs, Freedom, and the Forgotten History of Civil Rights

By: Sunday August 11, 2013 1:59 pm

In just a few weeks, the nation will be commemorating the fiftieth anniversary of the March on Washington, the civil rights demonstration that drew a quarter of a million participants to the National Mall in front of the Lincoln Memorial.

William Jones returns to that iconic moment in his new book, The March on Washington: Jobs, Freedom, and the Forgotten History of Civil Rights to remind us that the March was about far more than King’s dream, that the cast of characters involved in making the March a reality was far broader and larger than King and his advisors, and that the March had a much longer history, one that dates back to at least the early 1940s.

Our Twisted Politics of Grief

By: Tuesday May 28, 2013 5:25 pm

Darwin observed that conscience is what most distinguishes humans from other animals. If so, grief isn’t far behind. Realms of anguish are deeply personal—yet prone to expropriation for public use, especially in this era of media hyper-spin. Narratives often thresh personal sorrow into political hay. More than ever, with grief marketed as a civic commodity, the personal is the politicized.

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