This Speech Was Cut From Last Week’s March on Washington

By: Tuesday September 3, 2013 2:45 pm

Fifty years ago, at 19 years old, John Lewis was the youngest person to speak at the March on Washington.  In the days leading up to its commemoration, we’ve been reminded that Lewis’ words almost went unheard.  After the initial hand wringing from the Kennedy administration had subsided, and fearing embarrassment or violence, intense work was done to ensure that the content of the march didn’t veer into “radical” territory.  At the time, critics like Malcolm X denounced the March as something that was in fact orchestrated by the White House.

 

Beyond Stop and Frisk: Communities Organize for Deeper Reforms

By: Thursday August 29, 2013 5:00 pm

On August 22, the New York City Council voted to override Mayor Michael Bloomberg’s veto of the Community Safety Act, which is composed of two bills seeking to create more levels of accountability within the New York Police Department (NYPD) and prevent discriminatory practices, such as stop-and-frisk activity, from occurring.

The Community Safety Act was passed one week after Judge Shira A. Scheindlin declared, in Floyd v. The City of New York, that the NYPD’s stop-and-frisk program is unconstitutional because it violates the Fourth Amendment.

Fifty Years Ago: The Music of the March on Washington Rally

By: Wednesday August 28, 2013 6:52 pm

Songs give people the ability to muster the courage to dissent and keep on struggling for freedom and justice. They were part of the fabric of the civil rights movement. The importance of music is why musical performances at the March on Washington demonstration were necessary.

“Without the songs of the movement, personally I believe that there wouldn’t have been a movement,” Rutha Mae Harris, one of the original Freedom Singers, told NPR. “We needed those songs to help us not to be fearful when we were doing marches, or doing picket lines. And you needed a calming agent, and that’s what those songs were for us.”

Beyond Stop and Frisk: Communities Organize for Deeper Reforms

By: Wednesday August 28, 2013 2:20 pm

The Community Safety Act was passed one week after Judge Shira A. Scheindlin declared, in Floyd v. The City of New York, that the NYPD’s stop-and-frisk program is unconstitutional because it violates the Fourth Amendment. While we should be pleased a court ruled against the department’s stop-and-frisk policy—which is said to have violated the constitutional rights of many thousands of people, almost all of them Black and Latino, with the vast majority of them not found to have violated any crime—the ruling did not go far enough to ensure people in New York are protected from being unduly harassed and violated.

MLK is Why We Should Always Question the Surveillance State

By: Wednesday August 28, 2013 1:25 pm

On the 50th anniversary of the March on Washington for Jobs and Justice it is worth remembering that Martin Luther King, Jr. is a prime example of why we should always remain extremely skeptical of the surveillance state.

MLK Jr. on ‘Meet the Press’ Before March on Washington: How Little Views of Dissent Have Changed in Press

By: Sunday August 25, 2013 12:30 pm

Three days before the March on Washington in 1963, the NBC news program, “Meet the Press,” had Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. and executive secretary of the NAACP, Roy Wilkins, on the show to answer questions by a panel of white male journalists.

Washington Bureau Chief of the Nashville Banner, Frank van der Linden, NBC News White House correspondent Robert MacNeil, Cowles Newspaper Publications’ Richard Wilson and “Meet the Press” permanent member and co-creator Lawrence Spivak all appeared and neither of the panelists were supportive of the plans by civil rights groups to take action in a large-scale march in Washington, DC.

50 Years Later: Why Dreams Still Matter

By: Saturday August 24, 2013 11:46 am

Today, thousands from across the country (and perhaps the globe) will venture in Washington D.C. on the 50th anniversary of Martin Luther King´s ¨March on Washington¨ that had 250,000 people in attendance. One might ask themselves, if they are unaware of the significance of this event, why marching still matters. It is indeed a question that is relevant and should be discussed.

50 Years After the March on Washington, Still Fighting for Jobs and Freedom

By: Friday August 23, 2013 7:00 pm

On Saturday, August 24, tens of thousands of people will descend on the nation’s capital to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the 1963 March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom, the actual anniversary of which is August 28.

There have been some grumblings that the anniversary events will not duly encompass contemporary racial justice issues, and need to do more than re-live the famous images of the past

VIDEO: Donnie McClurkin Verbally Attacking Gays

By: Tuesday August 13, 2013 10:05 am

As I remarked early Sunday morning, the shuck-and-jive by Donnie McClurkin and his supporters has already started.

McClurkin, as you will remember, was uninvited Saturday night from the 50th anniversary concert of the 1963 March on Washington.

Now I have said why I felt McClurkin should not have been invited in the first place. I also said that in the controversy, which was sure to follow, both McClurkin and his supporters will spin as if McClurkin is a victim of discrimination and intolerance because he considers himself as “delivered from homosexuality through Jesus.”

Get Over Yourself, Donnie McClurkin. You Reap What You Sow

By: Sunday August 11, 2013 7:00 am

You see, the 1963 March on Washington was coordinated and successfully accomplished by Bayard Rustin, an openly gay African-American who was an integral part of the African-American civil rights movement. Rustin also mentored Dr. King on nonviolent resistance.

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