Putting War Back in Children’s Culture

By: Friday August 16, 2013 5:45 am

Now that Darth Vader’s breathy techno-voice is a staple of our culture, it’s hard to remember how empty was the particular sector of space Star Wars blasted into. The very day the Paris Peace Accords were signed in 1973, Richard Nixon also signed a decree ending the draft. It was an admission of the obvious: war, American-style, had lost its hold on young minds. As an activity, it was now to be officially turned over to the poor and nonwhite.

Those in a position to produce movies, TV shows, comics, novels, or memoirs about Vietnam were convinced that Americans felt badly enough without such reminders. It was simpler to consider the war film and war toy casualties of Vietnam than to create cultural products with the wrong heroes, victims, and villains.

 

President Carter Supports Snowden, Says America Does Not Have a Functioning Democracy

By: Friday July 19, 2013 3:00 pm

Former President Jimmy Carter, in an interview with Der Spiegel, said he supported whistleblower Edward Snowden and that the NSA’s domestic spying program was against American values.

Is Jimmy Carter the Reincarnation of Eleanor Roosevelt? Exclusive Photo Proof!

By: Friday June 7, 2013 5:00 pm

I spotted this photo of Eleanor Roosevelt on her pistol permit for New York State. I noticed a similarity with Former President Jimmy Carter so I put his photo on the card next to her so you can see it too.

Her getting a pistol permit reminds me that some people hated her. Did they hate her for her ideas or just because she was a woman?

FDL Book Salon Welcomes Jon Wiener, How We Forgot the Cold War: A Historical Journey Across America

By: Saturday March 23, 2013 1:59 pm

Wiener’s new book How We Forgot the Cold War is a travelogue of visits to sites across the US (plus one in Cuba and one in Grenada) where the Cold War is publicly commemorated. As different as they are—among them are half a dozen presidential libraries, a general’s tomb, missile silos, a VIP fallout shelter, a CIA museum that’s closed to the public, and a proposed $100 million Victims of Communism museum, a grandiose project that was never built—all of them are notable for a curious lacuna: the Cold War itself, or perhaps more accurately, the neo-conservative, triumphalist narrative about the Cold War that has been so successfully projected onto the memory of Ronald Reagan.

Seventy Years of Nuclear Fission: Short on Confidence; Long on Waste

By: Tuesday January 29, 2013 12:55 pm

On December 2, 1942, a small group of physicists under the direction of Enrico Fermi gathered on an old squash court beneath Alonzo Stagg Stadium on the Campus of the University of Chicago to make and witness history. Uranium pellets and graphite blocks had been stacked around cadmium-coated rods as part of an experiment crucial to the Manhattan Project–the program tasked with building an atom bomb for the allied forces in WWII.

Jimmy Carter Supports New State Marijuana Legalization Laws

By: Wednesday December 12, 2012 9:40 am

The fact that the voters in two states so overwhelmingly supported the change is making it much easier for politicians, government officials, and prominent public figures to speak out for the idea.

Barry Commoner, The First Guy I Ever Voted For, Dead at 95

By: Friday October 12, 2012 2:59 pm

Dr. Barry Commoner, scientist, activist, educator and one of the founders of the modern environmental movement, died on September 30 at his home in Brooklyn. He was 95.

I met Dr. Commoner in 1980, when he brought his third-party campaign for US president to my university. Running as the candidate of the Citizens Party, which he helped found, Commoner didn’t command an auditorium. Instead, Commoner sat in what I remember as a smallish classroom, discussing the state of the world with an egalitarian equanimity. He knew he wasn’t going to win the election, but he had things he wanted to explain, and a level of participation he wanted to motivate.

Voters Say They Aren’t Better Off Now Than Four Years Ago

By: Monday August 20, 2012 8:15 am

When running against Jimmy Carter, Ronald Reagan asked the American people if they were better off than they were four years ago. The phrase perfectly summarized in the most basic terms how democracy often winds up working. When things are going well, you don’t break what is working, but when things are going bad, it makes sense to try something new. If Romney were to ask voters in swing states that same question this year, he would receive a clear no, according to Gallup.

Revisiting CIA Torture on International Day of Support for Victims

By: Tuesday June 26, 2012 6:15 pm

The American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) points out, “On June 26, 1987, exactly twenty-five years ago, the Convention Against Torture became binding upon the nations that had ratified it.” So, today is not just some international day the United States and other powerful countries in the world will pay lip service to. Twenty-five years ago, an anti-torture convention was passed that the US then disregarded and violated explicitly when Bush was in power.

Fatster’s News Roundup from June 25, 2012

By: Tuesday June 26, 2012 6:13 am

Fatster’s daily roundup of news you may have missed from Monday, June 25, including stories about Syrian women, Syrian rebels, Silvio Berlusconi, Zeke Emanuel, record corporate profits, Jimmy Carter, watching drone strikes, Trans-Pacific Partnership negotiations, Darrell Issa, Joe Biden, Loch Ness Monster, voter suppression, Ruch Limbaugh, Apple wages, oil workers, and much more.

SUPPORT FIREDOGLAKE
Follow Firedoglake
TODAY’S TOP POSTS
CSM Ads advertisement
Advertisement