Director of Office of Research Integrity Resigns, Calls It Worst Job He’s Ever Had

By: Friday March 14, 2014 10:15 am

The Director of the Office of Research Integrity (ORI), David Wright (no relation), has resigned. His resignation letter reads as a comprehensive indictment of the federal bureaucracy which he worked for and called “remarkably dysfunctional” raising questions over the future of American research and innovation.

 

FDL Book Salon Welcomes Edward Luce, Time to Start Thinking: America in the Age of Descent

By: Saturday April 13, 2013 1:59 pm

Edward Luce’s book has been widely praised as carefully balanced and filled with evocative analysis and reportage. With a cast of dozens of academic, business and governmental thinkers, it wrestles with America’s relative economic decline, how the global economy is increasingly siphoning away America’s ability to innovate and manufacture, and a wide range of U.S. policy failures from education to healthcare to reinventing government. Too often Internet-entranced readers like me look for distillations to digest quickly, rather than dwell on the fascinating interviews, anecdotal treasure chest, and hard-nosed analyses in Mr. Luce’s detailed yet highly entertaining book.

Greentech Industries Imperiled by Anti-Stimulus, Removal of Federal Supports

By: Friday September 21, 2012 5:00 pm

One of the highlights of the stimulus package, according to Michael Grunwald’s book The New New Deal, was the $90 billion in investment in green energy. This kick-started a moribund industry and more than doubled the output of renewables as a percentage of overall energy.

What it did not do is secure the place of renewables in the US energy mix.

Occupy Innovation

By: Friday January 27, 2012 3:10 pm

If the US fought for the post-carbon economy the way it fights for nebulous state-building goals in foreign wars, the future would be brighter, cleaner, safer and cheaper, with more jobs and perhaps – because it would need to secure less of that foreign oil -fewer wars. If the country built new classrooms with the same urgency it built armored vehicles, more American teens could be choosing between colleges instead of choosing between minimum and sub-minimum wage jobs – and fewer would eventually need public assistance. If the government spent more on blackboards and less on bullets, it would create more jobs today and more innovation in the future.

Energy Innovation: Obama’s State of the Union a Frothy Mix of Promise and Prattle

By: Wednesday January 25, 2012 4:14 pm

When I turned on the TV last night, I wanted to stand up and cheer. While watching President Obama’s State of the Union address, I felt much like I did when I watched his 2008 acceptance speech at Mile High Stadium in Denver. OK, that’s not true–not hardly. Reality has not been kind to Obama’s rhetoric, after all. But when Obama got to the energy section of the speech, I found much to applaud, not unlike in 2008. . . with some obvious caveats for his praise of dirty, dangerous, failed or flat-out fictional forms of energy production.

Why the Market Will Not Reduce Health Care Costs

By: Monday June 20, 2011 12:30 pm

Looking at how the incentives in our health care market are currently set up, there is little reason to hope the “market” will magically come up with innovations to reduce our national health care spending. It is no surprise given looking at our structural innovation issues that for decades we have seen health care cost grow so rapidly.

A Siren Song from the Pentagon: Please Cut Our Budget, Invest in Human Capital

By: Tuesday April 26, 2011 9:47 am

It’s a sad commentary that the best vision for the future that has been put forward in years came out of the Pentagon from some unelected staffers.

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