Words, Deeds, Droughts, and Decisions on Climate Change

By: Saturday January 26, 2013 9:11 am

Three events collided this past week for me in the space of 36 hours, all revolving around climate change: Obama’s inaugural address, the death of John Chandley, and the decision of Nebraska’s governor to allow the Keystone XL pipeline to be built in his state. Three other events loom on the horizon: the ongoing drought, the Presidents Day protests in DC led by 350.org and Bill McKibben, and the eventual decision — one way or another — by President Obama on that pipeline.

Liberation Alliteration: O2.0

By: Monday January 21, 2013 12:07 pm

Today, our struggle for liberation and acceptance of American lesbians, gays, bisexuals, and transgenders (LGBT) reached a new milestone: for the first time in American history, the word “gay” was spoken as part of a presidential inaugural address.

Does Anyone in DC Remember *All* of Lincoln’s Second Inaugural?

By: Saturday January 19, 2013 9:05 am

On the eve of President Obama’s second inaugural address, I am reminded of Abraham Lincoln’s, delivered on the eve of both the end of the Civil War and his own assassination. Lincoln packed more into four paragraphs than others can deliver in forty pages, and every president since him dreams of trying to get even close to his eloquence. The last paragraph of that speech gets enormous attention — as it should — but if one doesn’t see what Lincoln does in the first three, that last immortal paragraph is robbed of its full power, and the powerful vision of the future he paints remains just that: a vision of the future.

CSM Ads advertisement
FOLLOW FIREDOGLAKE
Upcoming FDL Book Salons

Saturday, April 19, 2014
2:00 pm Pacific
Poison Candy: The Murderous Madam: Inside Dalia Dippolito’s Plot to Kill
Chat with Mark Ebner about his new book. Hosted by Beth Karas.

Sunday, April 20, 2014
2:00 pm Pacific
The Gulf of Tonkin Events – Fifty Years Later: A Footnote to the History of the Vietnam War
Chat with John White about his new book. Hosted by Pulitzer Prize winner Deborah J. Nelson.

Advertisement

Close