A Conversation With Scott Crow, Part 1: Occupy & Activism

By: Thursday February 13, 2014 6:59 pm

Scott Crow is a co-founder of the Common Ground Collective which provided grassroots solidarity and mutual aid after Hurricane Katrina. An anarchist activist, author and public speaker, he travels regularly to share his views. The second edition of his book about Common Ground, Black Flags and Windmills is due out soon. It’s one of multiple book-length projects in the works.

Both Scott & I call Austin home, so I invited him out for coffee and conversation on a recent break from an unusually chilly Central Texas winter.

 

FDL Movie Night: Informant

By: Monday September 30, 2013 4:59 pm

Informant follows the engrossing and disturbing story of Brandon Darby, the handsome, impassioned radical activist turned FBI informant and Tea Party hero whose work with the FBI led to one man’s death in Austin, Texas, and the trial and imprisonment of two anarchists during the 2008 Republican National Convention in Minneapolis-St. Paul. Our guest tonight, Director Jamie Meltzer, has crafted a taut tale with re-enactments that break the fourth wall, conflicting accounts of key incidents, and an unreliable, perhaps confabulist, narrator.

Climate Activist Tim DeChristopher & the Power of Civil Disobedience in Growing Movements

By: Sunday September 29, 2013 6:45 am

Climate activist Tim DeChristopher served twenty-one months in prison after disrupting a federal land auction that would have sold off the leasing rights to oil and gas companies. He stopped oil and gas companies from exploiting resources around the Arches and Canyonlands National Parks in southeastern Utah and nearby the Book Cliffs in eastern Utah.

He had not planned to buy the land, but when he was asked at the auction if he was there to bid, he saw an opportunity and said yes.

New Orleans Teachers Get Justice, but Schools Still Under Attack

By: Sunday July 1, 2012 6:45 am

After Hurricane Katrina washed over New Orleans, many survivors had virtually nothing left to lose. But the city’s teachers were then hit by the storm’s ripple effect: the loss of thousands of jobs in the tattered school system. Recently, a civil district court ruled that the state had effectively robbed thousands of school employees of funds that were supposed to help tide them over as the city recovered.

FDL Movie Night: Land of Opportunity

By: Monday October 18, 2010 5:00 pm

I love New Orleans. I fell in love with the city as a little girl, just by reading stories set there. I watched in agony as Hurricane Katrina approached, prayed with friends that the city would be spared and wept when the levees broke and destroyed so many lives. I was given the opportunity to research and fact-check the city online post-Katrina, followed by two amazing, transcendent trips to NOLA in 2006 and 2007 for the Voodoo Music Fest and then Mardi Gras. I cheered when the Super Bowl was held there with U2 playing at halftime and whooped with ecstatic joy embracing a group of Orleans-loving friends when the Saints won last season. New Orleans is at once languorous and vital, seductive, dangerous, joyous, profound, sacred, nasty, naughty, glorious. She is the Holy of Holies, full of magic and mystery, charm and force; fierce and exuberant.

FDL Movie Night: From Big Easy to Big Empty

By: Monday September 27, 2010 5:00 pm

Following the first broadcast of this film a criminal complaint was filed against producer Matt Pascarella and reporter Greg Palast by the Department of Homeland Security. The charge, filming “critical infrastructure” was dropped.

Maybe DHS was annoyed because From Big Easy to Big Empty, filmed a year after Hurricane Katrina, is critical of infrastructure, specifically Innovative Emergency Management of Baton Rouge which was paid a half-million dollars in 2004 to deliver a emergency preparedness and evacuation plan of New Orleans–only no one could find the plan when it was needed–that’s pretty innovative; and of FEMA itself which at the time of the filming, in 2006, had displaced 73,000 residents into trailer parks. Palast interviews a resident who explains that there is only bus out of the ironically named, barb-wired ringed Camp Renaissance, and it just goes to the Wal-Mart.

Who We Are: Zeitoun and Camp Greyhound Five Years On

By: Monday September 6, 2010 9:00 am

In a country founded on “self evident truths” such as life, liberty, equality, and due process of law, the timeless quote from Ben Franklin speaks to the peril imposed when the founding principles are discarded or compromised …

Gulf Coast Americans: At the End of Our Ropes

By: Monday May 31, 2010 6:00 am

Unless you’ve spent some time down here on the Gulf Coast, you’re unlikely to really understand the people that live down here. Hard scrabble is a way of life. Historically, we’ve had systemic attacks on our people, our culture and our environment. The hostility runs pretty deep down here because the history of maltreatment runs pretty deep. There are several historical events that you really need to understand to understand the people of Southeastern Louisiana and the surrounding areas

The Mistress of the Misunderstood and the Sea Captain: Day 6 & 7 on BP Oil Disaster

By: Monday May 17, 2010 6:30 pm

The Gulf of Mexico isn’t just a destination but a way of life embedded deeply in local culture. Is it the end of an era?

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