Monsters at the End of a War

By: Sunday August 17, 2014 4:00 pm

August 15 was the end of World War II in Asia, 69 years ago, following the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki.

I could not find a single reference to the bombings, or to the end of the war itself, anywhere in the American media. Even the Yazidis in Iraq, a big story a week ago, had yielded to the death of Robin Williams, who gave up his place at the top of the news to the shooting of a young African-American man in Missouri. There may be something else dominating the national agenda by the time you read this.

 

FDL Book Salon Welcomes Rick Perlstein, The Invisible Bridge: The Fall of Nixon and the Rise of Reagan

By: Sunday August 17, 2014 1:59 pm

It’s an honor to moderate today’s discussion of Rick Perlstein’s new book, The Invisible Bridge: The Fall of Nixon and the Rise of Reagan. For American history buffs and scholars alike, Rick’s work needs little introduction. He’s the acclaimed author of three major works on the rise of conservatism in the postwar United States (Before the Storm, Nixonland, and now The Invisible Bridge), whose journalism, criticism and writings on history have appeared in The Nation, Rolling Stone and countless other publications.

Not just do his books hit the best-seller lists and make the end-of-year best-book roundups, they have become part of the canon, required reading for aspiring American political historians—appearing on the syllabi for graduate seminars, a necessary part of the rite-of-passage hazing ritual for graduate students known as the comprehensive exam, and thus filtering down into the undergraduate lecture courses that introduce the college students of this country to twentieth-century American history.

FDL Book Salon Welcomes Ilan Stavans, A Most Imperfect Union: A Contrarian History of the United States

By: Saturday August 16, 2014 1:58 pm

This book uses cartoons and narrative to make the points on some of the things we absolutely know about US history that did not happen the way our myths lead us to believe. We follow the narrative of Stavans from the earliest colonial times, through the founding of the United States, the Civil War, the Great Depression, World War II, the Cold War through to the “War on Terror.” (This is not an inclusive list by any stretch.)

If Iraq Were in Central America

By: Wednesday July 16, 2014 4:15 pm

Just as in discussions of bombing nations for women’s rights it’s hard to bring up the subject of the right not to be bombed, in discussions of shipping so-called illegal children away from the border where you’ve been terrorizing them in reenactments of Freedom Ride buses it’s hard to bring up the subject of not having your government overthrown and your nation turned into a living hell.

FDL Movie Night: The American Brew

By: Monday July 7, 2014 4:59 pm

Beer! This miraculous beverage is actually more American than apple pie, and its history is linked inextricably with our country’s. Tonight’s guest, director Roger Sherman, a founder of Florentine Films with Ken Burns, brings us The American Brew a fine crafted, bubbly film with depth and flavor that explores our nation’s relationship with beer.

Court: No Matter How Long Ago It Happened, CIA Can Keep Final Volume of Bay of Pigs History Secret

By: Tuesday May 20, 2014 5:45 pm

A federal appeals court has ruled against the release of the final volume of CIA history of the Bay of Pigs invasion in Cuba. It decided the agency could keep it secret under an exemption in the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) that is supposed to protect inter-agency or intra-agency memorandums or letters from being subject to release.

Don’t Let The Religious Right Whitewash Their History of Anti-Gay Oppression

By: Tuesday April 29, 2014 4:50 pm

The anti-gay group Concerned Women for America is furious at the National Women’s History Museum Project. The group is especially angry that there is no mention of religious right activists, particularly its founder, Beverly LaHaye.

Not good enough…but an unexpected start

By: Friday April 25, 2014 1:30 am

One of the truly under-reported human rights tragedies of the 20th Century was the Armenian Genocide undertaken by the then Ottoman Empire (soon to be Turkey) under the rule of the “Young Turks”. In a great swatch of ethnic cleansing that served as a model/inspiration for the Nazis a generation later, thousands of Armenians were butchered and then the remainder were forced into the desolate interior of Anatolia where a great many perished via starvation, disease, or violence.

Remembering Bloody Ludlow – One Hundred Years On

By: Sunday April 20, 2014 12:45 pm

On the morning of April 20, 1914, agents of the Baldwin-Felts detective agency along with Colorado national guardsmen massed on a ridge overlooking a tent city of hundreds of coal miners and their families that occupied the plain below – roughly a half mile from the village of Ludlow, Colorado. They came armed, with some men on horseback but with others setting up machine gun positions able to sweep over the encampment. Inside the thin cotton tents were some 1200 men, women and children.

Where We Were When FDR Passed Away

By: Sunday April 13, 2014 6:52 pm

Ray Owings, age 91, and Letty Owings, age 89, recall their memories before and after April 12, 1945, when US President Franklin Delano Roosevelt (FDR) passed away. FDR was elected for four consecutive terms, and remains the only president ever to serve more than eight years.

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Upcoming FDL Book Salons

Saturday, August 30, 2014
2:00 pm Pacific
The Nixon Defense: What He Knew and When He Knew It
Chat with John Dean about his new book.

Sunday, August 31, 2014
2:00 pm Pacific
Imagine: Living In A Socialist USA
Chat with Pau LeBlanc, Debby Smith, and Michael Steven Smith about their new book. Hosted by Deena Stryker

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