If Iraq Were in Central America

By: Wednesday July 16, 2014 4:15 pm

Just as in discussions of bombing nations for women’s rights it’s hard to bring up the subject of the right not to be bombed, in discussions of shipping so-called illegal children away from the border where you’ve been terrorizing them in reenactments of Freedom Ride buses it’s hard to bring up the subject of not having your government overthrown and your nation turned into a living hell.

 

FDL Movie Night: The American Brew

By: Monday July 7, 2014 4:59 pm

Beer! This miraculous beverage is actually more American than apple pie, and its history is linked inextricably with our country’s. Tonight’s guest, director Roger Sherman, a founder of Florentine Films with Ken Burns, brings us The American Brew a fine crafted, bubbly film with depth and flavor that explores our nation’s relationship with beer.

Court: No Matter How Long Ago It Happened, CIA Can Keep Final Volume of Bay of Pigs History Secret

By: Tuesday May 20, 2014 5:45 pm

A federal appeals court has ruled against the release of the final volume of CIA history of the Bay of Pigs invasion in Cuba. It decided the agency could keep it secret under an exemption in the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) that is supposed to protect inter-agency or intra-agency memorandums or letters from being subject to release.

Don’t Let The Religious Right Whitewash Their History of Anti-Gay Oppression

By: Tuesday April 29, 2014 4:50 pm

The anti-gay group Concerned Women for America is furious at the National Women’s History Museum Project. The group is especially angry that there is no mention of religious right activists, particularly its founder, Beverly LaHaye.

Not good enough…but an unexpected start

By: Friday April 25, 2014 1:30 am

One of the truly under-reported human rights tragedies of the 20th Century was the Armenian Genocide undertaken by the then Ottoman Empire (soon to be Turkey) under the rule of the “Young Turks”. In a great swatch of ethnic cleansing that served as a model/inspiration for the Nazis a generation later, thousands of Armenians were butchered and then the remainder were forced into the desolate interior of Anatolia where a great many perished via starvation, disease, or violence.

Remembering Bloody Ludlow – One Hundred Years On

By: Sunday April 20, 2014 12:45 pm

On the morning of April 20, 1914, agents of the Baldwin-Felts detective agency along with Colorado national guardsmen massed on a ridge overlooking a tent city of hundreds of coal miners and their families that occupied the plain below – roughly a half mile from the village of Ludlow, Colorado. They came armed, with some men on horseback but with others setting up machine gun positions able to sweep over the encampment. Inside the thin cotton tents were some 1200 men, women and children.

Where We Were When FDR Passed Away

By: Sunday April 13, 2014 6:52 pm

Ray Owings, age 91, and Letty Owings, age 89, recall their memories before and after April 12, 1945, when US President Franklin Delano Roosevelt (FDR) passed away. FDR was elected for four consecutive terms, and remains the only president ever to serve more than eight years.

Coates, Chait and the Iraq War Understanding of Gratitude

By: Sunday April 6, 2014 12:00 pm

Ta-Nehisi Coates and Jonathan Chait have had a fascinating exchange on race over the last couple of weeks. Chait has been arguing from a perspective of culture. Coates, while spending time on culture, has also tried to get Chait to see the connection between culture and the lived history of the African American community. And Chait repeatedly fails to even acknowledge that (large) part of Coates’ thesis.

Saturday Art: Influential Authors: Sharon Kay Penman

By: Saturday March 1, 2014 5:20 pm

The first of Penman’s books I read was the first of the Justin de Quincy medieval mysteries, The Queen’s Man, which as I said, I found in a box of books in my sister’s condo. I like mysteries. I like books set in historical and especially medieval times, so this was a no-brainer for me to pick up and read.

Black History Month, Fried Chicken and American Historical Ignorance

By: Tuesday February 11, 2014 6:10 pm

Nearly half way through Black History Month 2014, the only story remotely related to black history that seems to have broken into the national consciousness is one from California in which a high school came under criticism for offering the stereotypical African-American cuisine of fried chicken and watermelon on its lunch menu.

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