FDL Book Salon Welcomes Jeff Madrick, Seven Bad Ideas: How Mainstream Economists Have Damaged America and the World

By: Saturday November 29, 2014 1:59 pm

By investigating how these myths arose, why they gained traction, how to know they’re wrong, and what damage they’ve done, Jeff Madrick demands that we rethink what we imagine we know about economics, and suggests that we can prevent or, failing that, effectively solve the next Great Recession by tossing the old, bad ideas out and adopting an updated understanding of the dynamics involved in a prosperous, equitable, sustainable economy. It may take a lot to get policymakers, media, and the world to question and reject the proclamations of MIT and Harvard economists, but Madrick’s book hopes to contribute to that effort.

 

All About Money

By: Sunday June 15, 2014 5:20 pm

The people who are in charge of everything believe that it’s right, proper, indeed ‘natural’ that they be in charge of everything because they believe that no one could do as good a job of being in charge of everything .

May 2014 Jobs Reports: Good News, Bad News

By: Wednesday June 4, 2014 2:18 pm

Through all these four plus years of job growth to get back to where we were at the start of the Great Recession, we have been falling behind as it takes roughly 90,000 new jobs each month just to keep up with the new people entering the job market each month. If we take it back to the beginning of the Great Recession in December 2007, we are still in the hole on needed jobs by a bit over 7M (6.5 (years) x 12 (months per year) x 90K (jobs per month) = 7,020,000.)

FDL Book Salon Welcomes David Stuckler and Sanjay Basu, The Body Economic: Why Austerity Kills: Recessions, Budget Battles, and the Politics of Life and Death

By: Saturday June 29, 2013 1:59 pm

David Stuckler and Sanjay Basu’s new book The Body Economic: Why Austerity Kills is a thorough examination of the toll that recessions take on people’s health. They show, convincingly, that there are many, many channels through which health outcomes can deteriorate when the economy goes into a deep recession. They also show that the manner in which the government reacts to an economic downturn is a critical factor in determining health outcomes. Deterioration in health in a recession, though common, is far from inevitable.

FDL Book Salon Welcomes Gar Alperovitz, What Then Must We Do?: Straight Talk About the Next American Revolution

By: Sunday May 12, 2013 1:59 pm

In What Then Must We Do?, political economy professor Gar Alperovitz slowly and deliberately nudges readers off the traditional course of political activism assumed to bring about progressive change – elections, legislative fights, protest actions, firing the twin engines of grassroots Democratic groups and organized labor – arguing that these methods have failed. He finds readers at that moment of despair, when the best efforts we’ve known to create the space for change have failed. Indeed, he doesn’t believe that these efforts can reverse what is now a decades-long march of structural economic, environmental and political decline. “Absent major national shocks,” he writes, “the capacity for fundamental political change is limited in the American context.”

FDL Book Salon Welcomes Robert Kuttner, Debtors’ Prison: The Politics of Austerity Versus Possibility

By: Saturday May 4, 2013 1:59 pm

Robert Kuttner’s Debtors’ Prison ties together many of the individual fights progressives are battling over into a general argument for why our economy is broken 5 years after the Great Recession began. There are those fighting both Republicans and some Democrats on topics ranging from austerity to foreclosure relief and financial sector accountability, while there are fellow activists in Europe fighting against the European Central Bank’s policy of tight money and anti-democratic takeovers of local policy.

FDL Book Salon Welcomes Hedrick Smith, Who Stole The American Dream?

By: Sunday February 3, 2013 1:59 pm

There are books about Washington and books about business. Rarely do these worlds collide so dramatically than in Hedrick Smith’s Who Stole The American Dream. He explores pivotal decisions and their relative impacts in these two seemingly disparate worlds with keen insight and analysis. The relationships and connections he traces can be described as a “mash-up” of some of his best reporting.

FDL Book Salon Welcomes L. Randall Wray, Modern Money Theory: A Primer on Macroeconomics for Sovereign Monetary Systems

By: Saturday January 5, 2013 1:59 pm

I am hosting the Firedoglake discussion of my colleague Randy Wray’s new “Primer” on macroeconomics. Macroeconomics is the study of the overall economy – economic growth, recessions, depressions, inflation, unemployment, and employment are big issues that macroeconomics studies. The key policies it addresses are usually divided into fiscal (tax and spending) and monetary policies (the growth of the money supply and setting interest rates).

The concept of monetary tools has broadened as we have seen the Federal Reserve change what had been a severely constrained “lender of last resort” function of the central bank into the most massive bailout program in history. Similarly, the central bank’s interest rate setting function that was long focused on short-term rates has expanded into large experiments that attempt to lower long-term interest rates (“quantitative easing”).

The Central Question Posed by the Great Crash

By: Saturday April 21, 2012 4:00 pm

The Great Crash posed one question for this country: who would bear the losses? Would it be the banks that caused the problems? The officers, directors and shareholders of those banks? Their careless counterparties? The investors who bought the fraudulent real estate mortgage-backed securities and the complex spin-offs? The owners of capital who threw money into hedge funds and other exotic investments expecting a geyser of money in return?

No.

FDL Book Salon Welcomes Vanessa Williamson, The Tea Party and the Remaking of Republican Conservatism

By: Sunday December 11, 2011 1:59 pm

I encourage readers to purchase two copies of The Tea Party and the Remaking of Republican Conservatism – one for themselves and one as a Christmas present for their right wing uncle. That uncle might well stay with Skocpol and Williamson’s highly readable and well-crafted study to the end without throwing it down in anger – something I can’t say with much confidence about my book with DiMaggio.

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