Posse Comitatus and the Fourth Amendment

By: Tuesday September 30, 2014 7:35 am

Back in pre-Constitution America, the British army would burst into the homes and businesses of American colonists.
The searches would often be destructive, and intended so. Some of the time the point was to seize incriminating “revolutionary” materials, many times the point was simply to harass and threaten people the Crown feared and wanted to send a message to. It was in direct response to such invasions of freedom that the Founders wrote in the Fourth Amendment “The right of the people to be secure in their persons, houses, papers, and effects, against unreasonable searches and seizures, shall not be violated…”

 

Ray McGovern Triumphs Over State Department

By: Friday September 26, 2014 6:50 am

Ray McGovern was put on the State Department’s Diplomatic Security BOLO list– Be On the Look Out– one of a series of proliferating government watch lists.[/caption]If you don’t know Ray McGovern yet, you probably should.

You see, Ray just beat down, in court, Hillary Clinton, the State Department, and a small part of Post-Constitutional America.

Judge Rules Against ACLU, Fails to Resolve Issue of US Marshals Seizing ‘StingRay’ Surveillance Records

By: Wednesday June 18, 2014 10:22 am

A city circuit judge dismissed a lawsuit seeking applications to the Florida state court and the state court’s orders approving the use of “StingRay” devices capable of surveillance of entire communities. But the judge did not resolve the issue of the United States Marshal’s Service seizing copies of records from the Sarasota Police Department so the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) would not be able to get them.

Media Organizations Challenge Secrecy Around Execution Drugs for Lethal Injections

By: Thursday May 15, 2014 4:20 pm

Five media organizations are challenging Missouri’s Department of Corrections, which is keeping critical information about execution drugs that are being used for lethal injections secret.

‘Most Transparent Administration Ever™’—Obama Administration Makes Mockery of Open Government

By: Monday March 17, 2014 11:25 am

The Associated Press conducted its annual review of government data related to the Freedom of Information Act. It found that the “government’s efforts to be more open about its activities last year were their worst since President Barack Obama took office.”

Declassified History Provides Remarkable Look at NSA Operations During the Cold War

By: Thursday September 26, 2013 9:30 am

A National Security Agency history of intelligence activities during the Cold War has been further declassified. For the first time, the names of a few of the people who were on a watch list operated by the NSA have not been withheld. The history also contains various details that are exceptionally relevant to the debate around US intelligence and privacy that former NSA contractor Edward Snowden ignited.

Circumventing Transparency: Pennsylvania’s Latest Shell Game to Protect Big Energy

By: Sunday May 26, 2013 5:20 pm

David M. Jacobson wanted a transcript of a public hearing conducted by the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection (DEP), May 2.

All Jacobson had to do was drive the 25 miles from his home in Lewisburg to the Williamsport regional office between 8 a.m. and 4 p.m., Monday through Friday.

Supreme Court Affirms Constitution Doesn’t Guarantee Citizens Access to Public Information

By: Tuesday April 30, 2013 10:20 am

The Supreme Court unanimously ruled on Monday that Virginia did not have to grant access to public records in the state to non-residents of Virginia under the state’s freedom of information law.

The decision, according to SCOTUSblog, did not break any new ground. It did not “rely upon any sweeping new legal declaration, but simply on the purpose that the Court found behind Virginia’s law.”

Chicago Public Schools’ Ban of ‘Persepolis’ Continues to Face Challenge From Anti-Censorship Alliance

By: Friday April 12, 2013 12:26 pm

An alliance of nonprofit organizations committed to promoting freedom of thought and free expression has been challenging a decision by Chicago Public Schools (CPS) to ban Marjane Satrapi’s graphic novel, Persepolis. It has also sought more information on what led to the decision by filing Freedom of Information Act requests.

Court Rejects Justice Department Effort to Enshrine Catch-22 Into Freedom of Information Law

By: Wednesday April 3, 2013 1:05 pm

A federal appeals court in Washington, DC, rebuffed a clear attempt by the United States Justice Department to further pervert the Freedom of Information Act process.

Citizens for Responsibility and Ethics in Washington (CREW) sued the Federal Election Commission (FEC) on May 24, 2011, when it failed to produce documents on individuals at the FEC, who CREW believed were refusing to enforce campaign finance laws. The lawsuit challenged the withholding of the documents and also the Justice Department’s interpretation of a rule in freedom of information law that requires agencies to communicate a “determination” on whether it will comply with the FOIA request within 20 working days.

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