During the recent decade or more, thousands of the “irate minority” (urban farmers, locavores, small organic farmers, co-op growers, independent organic grocers, local restaurateurs, non-for profits) began challenging the food system in many different ways. The spur of urban farms began well before Dickson had written his book, but somehow they have not been able to make a real dent in the hyper-centralized food system. Coincidentally, the market has spoken as well. When consumers became more educated about their food choices and began demanding better, healthier and fresher food, local grocers and restaurants responded to growing demand by providing what is left of the local food to fork. Many good food activists and promoters have been searching for an economically sustainable solution to developing a healthy, thriving local-urban food system.