US Police Idly Watch as Congo President’s Security Force Beats Protesters on American Streets

By: Thursday August 7, 2014 10:33 am

Despite the protests of Democratic Republic of Congo President Joesph Kabila’s presidency taking place on American soil, President Kabila’s security forces saw fit to brutalize the protesters – beating them right in front of American law enforcement. Video shows what is believed to be a member of President Kabila’s security detail stomp a protester as a US police officer looks on. The thugs walk away and all the police do is offer to call the beaten man an ambulance – protect and serve much?

 

Chiwetel Ejiofor Wrote & Directed a Short Film Highlighting Exploitation of Coltan in Congo

By: Sunday December 15, 2013 11:45 am

Bloodshed in Congo can be directly connected to the latest form of colonialism advanced by Western countries—the mining of resources for electronics and military industries. Over six million people have been killed in war over control of resources in the country since 1996.

FDL Book Salon Welcomes David Axe, Army of God: Joseph Kony’s War in Central Africa

By: Saturday May 11, 2013 1:59 pm

I finished Army of God while standing outside a DC metro station, after exiting for my final stop — it’s a gripping book, one filled with striking images that hammer home the visceral, immersive terror of the Lord’s Resistance Army’s (LRA) raids on Congolese villages. It also raises, for progressives committed to resolving the humanitarian monstrosity that is the ongoing violence in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC), difficult questions about just what kinds of government intervention and non-state activism might make a real difference.

Questioning the Paternalism of Patriarchs

By: Saturday May 5, 2012 9:00 am

Patriarchal paternalism is at the heart of leadership, according to the Vatican’s Congregation of the Doctrine of the Faith in their assessment of the Leadership Conference of Women Religious.

Sadly, that kind of paternalistic leadership rarely works out well. See the stories pouring out of a Philadelphia courtroom over the last month, or the horrific story from Sister Joan Chittister, OSB from her recent trip to Africa.

I thank God for those who speak out against anyone who imperiously looks at the world and asks “Who are you to question us?” I thank God for the sisters of LCWR, and especially for Sister Joan.

FDL Movie Night: Children Of War

By: Monday December 6, 2010 5:00 pm

Wow. Children of War, directed by tonight’s guest Bryan Single, is jaw dropping stunning in both content and delivery. The story of children abducted and forced to join Ugandan rebel Kony and his Lord’s Resistance Army, then rescued by government soldiers and brought to Rachele Rehabilitation Center is powerfully filmed in black and white over a three-year period.

Single and his crew had unprecedented access to process of healing these children, and focused on three in particular: Akulu, Nyero, and Polycap. Akula was kidnapped and given to rebel leader Abonga Papa as his wife. Polycap and Nyero gradually open up to their counselors and admit to having killed; they come to realize that their will was not their own.

FDL Book Salon Welcomes Ted Rall, The Anti-American Manifesto

By: Sunday October 24, 2010 1:58 pm

As a cartoonist, columnist, radio host, TV guest and graphic novelist, Ted Rall has always been hard to categorize. Rall is liberal and an environmentalist, to be sure, but he’s a peculiar brand of both. He’s not scared of guns or all gun owners and he’s got a strong law-and-order streak. He seems to dismiss popular “peak oil” theories that anticipate a rapid and disastrous fall-off in petroleum production. He’s equally critical of Democrats and Republicans.

Rall is most notorious for his U.S. political commentary. A 2004 cartoon criticizing football player-turned-soldier Pat Tillman, who was killed by “friendly” fire in Afghanistan, is easily Rall’s most famous work. But arguably Rall’s most unique and important work has grown out of his infrequent jaunts through foreign conflict zones, particularly in Central Asia. A trip to Afghanistan in 2001 produced the graphic novel To Afghanistan and Back, one of the best and most prescient books on the now decade-old war. For all that, Rall’s most eloquent work isn’t political at all. His memoir The Year of Loving Dangerously recounts his turbulent but passionate youth.

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