A Conversation With Scott Crow, Part 3: Intersectionality & Technology

By: Tuesday February 25, 2014 12:15 pm

One important tool which defines modern activism is the use of social media for organizing and building solidarity. While social media does little unless paired with “meatspace” direct action, it can be a powerful tool for motivating people, reporting on live events, and building intersectionality. When arrests first occurred at Occupy Austin, we heard from activists in Egypt who had staged an impromptu protest at the US Embassy.

 

A Conversation With Scott Crow, Part 2: Mutual Aid

By: Sunday February 16, 2014 9:21 am

One reason I wanted to chat with Scott Crow was his experience with Common Ground Collective in New Orleans. In recent years, we’ve seen similar collectives spring out of the activist networks formed by Occupy Wall Street — projects like Occupy Sandy. Late last year, alongside key Common Ground Collective organizer Lisa Fithian and many others, I organized Austin Common Ground Relief to respond to a record-breaking flood on Halloween. As the group’s dispatcher, I relied on the networks and skills formed during Occupy Austin.

FDL Book Salon Welcomes Mary L. Dudziak, War Time: An Idea, Its History, Its Consequences

By: Saturday October 19, 2013 1:59 pm

In War Time we are shown how the Cold War years and the development of the Military-Industrial-Complex moved us into a period (which continues today) of grossly disproportionate spending on the military, permanent infringement on civil rights, and so used to war and militarism that we now accept it as the norm. Terrorism is the new communism and must be defended against at all costs. She also discusses other factors that affect the public’s perceptions of wartime and peacetime, such as the roles of government propaganda, the media, citizen sacrifice, proximity of the conflict, and the number of Americans killed.

FDL Book Salon Welcomes Kate Brown, Plutopia: Nuclear Families, Atomic Cities, and the Great Soviet and American Plutonium Disasters

By: Saturday June 8, 2013 1:59 pm

Kate Brown’s Plutopia is the tale of two atomic cities — twin siblings of the Cold War, created for the purpose of harvesting the plutonium that fueled the post-war nuclear arms race.

The top-secret reactors at the Pentagon’s Hanford plutonium plant lead to the creation of Richland, a planned city built in the wind-scraped wastelands of Washington State. The residents – all white and privileged – lived in a perfectly landscaped consumers’ paradise complete with federally subsidized housing and free medical care. Russia’s plutopia was called Ozersk. It was built in the Urals, near the plutonium mills of Maiak, and it was so secret it didn’t appear on official maps.

FDL Book Salon Welcomes Jon Wiener, How We Forgot the Cold War: A Historical Journey Across America

By: Saturday March 23, 2013 1:59 pm

Wiener’s new book How We Forgot the Cold War is a travelogue of visits to sites across the US (plus one in Cuba and one in Grenada) where the Cold War is publicly commemorated. As different as they are—among them are half a dozen presidential libraries, a general’s tomb, missile silos, a VIP fallout shelter, a CIA museum that’s closed to the public, and a proposed $100 million Victims of Communism museum, a grandiose project that was never built—all of them are notable for a curious lacuna: the Cold War itself, or perhaps more accurately, the neo-conservative, triumphalist narrative about the Cold War that has been so successfully projected onto the memory of Ronald Reagan.

Your Economic Liberty Ends Where My Bank Account Begins

By: Sunday April 1, 2012 10:30 am

Your worship of your own economic freedom is no reason for me to pay for your health care.

FDL Movie Night: The Blob

By: Monday July 4, 2011 5:00 pm

What could be more all-American and patriotic than a teen exploitation horror flick made by a crew specializing in religious and instructional films starring Steve McQueen. Ladies and gentlemen: The Blob, directed by Irvin S. Yeaworth, featuring a theme song by Burt Bacharach, is a masterpiece of small town angst and urgency that launched the careers of two superstars from the U.S. of A!

FDL Book Salon Welcomes Andrew Kolin, State Power and Democracy: Before and During the Presidency of George W. Bush

By: Sunday May 15, 2011 1:59 pm

This compelling book traces the history of the assault on democracy and the rise of a police state that reached its zenith in the George W. Bush administration. From the war on communism, to the war on labor, to the war terrorism, our government has used surveillance, preventive detention, torture, and a climate of fear to consolidate its power and neutralize dissent. Under the guise of nurturing democracy at home and abroad, the U.S. government has actually undermined it.

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