150 Years After Appomattox, the GOP Revises Their Views

By: Saturday April 11, 2015 10:00 am

The more things change, the more things change.

Consider the remarks of a certain Republican president from 1865, and how the Republican candidates for president in 2016 might rewrite those words today. They certainly wouldn’t sign on to them as Lincoln wrote them.

 

Saturday History: The Hicklin Place

By: Saturday February 28, 2015 12:00 pm

The farm my father purchased in 1920 was referred to as the “Hicklin place” because it was a hundred and sixty acres carved from the Hicklin plantation. The designation “plantation” was given to land owned by a farmer if he had at least twenty slaves. The graveyard for the Hicklin slaves was on our farm. My father plowed around it, so it survived as a weed patch with tumble-down tombstones. As a kid, I sometimes walked there to have a look. It always gave me the creeps, especially when I noticed how many of the stones marked the resting place for children. I wondered what they had looked like and why they had died so young.

Giuliani’s Old Elementary Teacher is Not Happy With Him

By: Saturday February 21, 2015 10:00 am

If only I could get regular mail. Instead, I get anonymous phone calls.

This time it pointed me to an old schoolhouse near Kansas City. “Go behind the south wing, and you’ll see where there used to be a garden. Walk past it, and when you find an old compost pile, look for an envelope. I think you’ll be very interested in what’s inside.”

Curious, I pushed back a bit. “Lots of things might interest me. What’s in that envelope that’s so special that I should go looking for a pile of compost?”

The voice on the phone paused, then said “It’s a letter from one of my grandparents to Rudy Giuliani.”

“Why can’t your grandparent simply put it in the mail?” I asked.

“Two reasons. First, you need a mailing address, and we don’t have one. Second, though, and more important, is privacy. You see, my grandparent was Rudy Giuliani’s elementary school teacher. Go find that letter, please.”

I did . . .

Saturday Art: Influential Authors: Lew Wallace

By: Saturday September 6, 2014 4:19 pm

I was surprised when I first read some of Wallace’s bio and discovered he had been a general in the Union Army during the Civil War. Even more surprising was learning that he had been the territorial governor of New Mexico during the Lincoln County War:

Celebrating Confederate History Month Isn’t Just for The South

By: Saturday April 12, 2014 9:14 am

Ah, the heritage of the Confederacy. The South may have surrendered at Appomattox, but the war continues to be fought — and not just in the South, and not just by southerners. But of course, that’s where we need to start…

Earlier this week, Virginia’s Democratic Governor Terry McAuliffe announced that he would not be issuing any kind of proclamation making April “Confederate History Month” in his state, unlike several of his recent Republican predecessors. Among certain parts of the citizenry, that did not go over well.

#WithSyria: Banksy Launches New Campaign for 3rd Anniversary of Syrian Civil War

By: Saturday March 15, 2014 4:00 pm

March 15th marks the third anniversary of the start of the Syrian Civil War and street artist Banksy is adamant that the day not come and go quietly.

Banksy orchestrated the #withsyria campaign in solidarity with the Syrian civilians whose lives have been uprooted by the conflict and in memory of the over 100,000 men, women and children who have died over the last three years.

Why Obama Really Needs to Take This Syria Deal

By: Tuesday September 10, 2013 10:24 am

If Obama’s concern was about chemical weapons only, then this sounds like a win to the American people. But if Obama’s real goal was to find a pretext to greatly increase help to the rebels, this would be a bad deal.

Fifty Years After King’s Dream Speech, Nullification Keeps on Marching

By: Saturday August 24, 2013 9:00 am

Each time I read or hear Martin Luther King Jr’s “I Have a Dream” speech, a different piece leaps out at me. Today, as we come to the fiftieth anniversary of that speech, it’s this:

I have a dream that one day, down in Alabama, with its vicious racists, with its governor having his lips dripping with the words of “interposition” and “nullification” — one day right there in Alabama little black boys and black girls will be able to join hands with little white boys and white girls as sisters and brothers.

The language of nullification — the thought that state laws can trump federal laws — is still a part of our national lexicon, despite the fact that the Nullifiers lost the Civil War. Indeed, here in Missouri, it’s become a very large part of the state political conversation.

Does Anyone in DC Remember *All* of Lincoln’s Second Inaugural?

By: Saturday January 19, 2013 9:05 am

On the eve of President Obama’s second inaugural address, I am reminded of Abraham Lincoln’s, delivered on the eve of both the end of the Civil War and his own assassination. Lincoln packed more into four paragraphs than others can deliver in forty pages, and every president since him dreams of trying to get even close to his eloquence. The last paragraph of that speech gets enormous attention — as it should — but if one doesn’t see what Lincoln does in the first three, that last immortal paragraph is robbed of its full power, and the powerful vision of the future he paints remains just that: a vision of the future.

Truckin’ to Treason: The Hot Air of Secession

By: Saturday November 24, 2012 6:40 pm

A white Ford F-250 pick-up rumbled through town, a Confederate rebel flag on a pole behind the cab; on the rear bumper were a pro-life and three Anti-Obama stickers, two of which could not be revealed in a family newspaper.

It wasn’t a lone wolf protest; several cars, trucks, and homes in the area sport similar flags and messages.

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