The entire population, guilty of deliberate indifference

By: Tuesday June 3, 2014 1:30 am

When a group that is viewed with disdain by the public as well as the legal system, this is the sort of thing that happens as a consequence.

 

A police badge is not a license to kill

By: Saturday April 5, 2014 6:40 pm

A police badge is not a license to kill.

Arizona’s SB 1062 and The Human Nature of Hate

By: Monday March 3, 2014 6:17 pm

I’ve tried to let the veto of SB 1062 percolate in my mind for a bit and settle on its meaning. Some, like Brian Beutler, have argued that the veto of SB 1062 has ended the use of “religious freedom” as a pretext for anti-gay discrimination. I think the veto is even more significant than that, as it assures the end to formal anti-gay discrimination in the US. To see why, it is important to place the veto not in the context of politics, but in the context of our conflicted human nature.

Late Night: Feed ‘em to the Lions

By: Thursday February 27, 2014 8:00 pm

Lately, I’ve had it about up to my ears with this business of “Religious Liberty.” Why, in heaven’s name, should people who loudly and gaudily believe false and harmful things, and yet think that by so doing they should feel unburdened by the laws we heathens must follow, need any more liberty than they already have? If anything, these cretinous sociopaths need less than the rest of us, as they demonstrate each day.

RIP: Pete Seeger

By: Tuesday January 28, 2014 8:00 pm

Pete Seeger, folk singer and activist whose music and straight talk inspired generations of musicians and activists, has died. He was 94. Known for songs like “If I Had a Hammer,” “Turn, Turn, Turn,” and “Where Have All the Flowers Gone”, Seeger–who joined the Young Communist League (YCL) in 1936 and the Communist Party USA in 1942, eventually drifting away from them in the early 1950s–performed for troops in the South Pacific during World War II. He was convicted of contempt of Congress after refusing to answer questions at the House Un-American Activities Committee.

Our “civilized” society

By: Tuesday January 14, 2014 1:30 am

“Experimenting” with ways to kill people has an awful Josef Mengele quality to it.

The Politics of Dignity: What’s at Stake

By: Saturday December 28, 2013 6:40 pm

The perpetrators and targets of rankism–the somebodies and the nobodies, respectively–do not fall neatly into distinct groups. As we’ve seen, most of us have played both roles, depending on time and place.

Belonging: A Memoir – The Oberlin Years

By: Sunday December 15, 2013 8:37 am

During my first week in office at Oberlin, a professor, twenty years my senior, had dropped by my office to wish me well. As he left he said, “Good-bye, Dad”—those very words! I thought it was a joke until I saw the expression on his face: it was that of a little boy. The words that had escaped his lips had nothing to do with me as an individual, everything to do with my office and title.

VIDEO: Azadeh Zohrabi on CA Hunger Strikers, Solitary Confinement, and Herman Wallace

By: Monday November 25, 2013 7:15 pm

Azadeh Zohrabi spoke in San Francisco on November 8, 2013, at an event alongside Robert H. King of the Angola 3, who was released in 2001 after 29 years in continuous solitary confinement.

FDL Book Salon Welcomes Gavin Wright, Sharing the Prize: the Economics of the Civil Rights Revolution in the American South

By: Saturday October 26, 2013 1:59 pm

Today we have the privilege of holding a conversation with Professor Gavin Wright on his book on the Civil Rights Revolution in the American South, Sharing the Prize. To many of us who came of age before Vietnam (BV), the Civil Rights Movement was a defining moment of moral and political consciousness. I participated in sit-ins in autumn 1960 and spring 1961; in 1963 Gavin was in North Carolina registering black voters. As a nation, the two great Civil Rights laws of 1964 and 1965 represent one of the few things we did right in the past half century, and in this autumn of our discontent, it’s good to remind ourselves that we still may be capable of doing the right thing. But what difference did the Revolution make to the people most directly affected by it?

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