FDL Movie Night: Informant

By: Monday September 30, 2013 4:59 pm

Informant follows the engrossing and disturbing story of Brandon Darby, the handsome, impassioned radical activist turned FBI informant and Tea Party hero whose work with the FBI led to one man’s death in Austin, Texas, and the trial and imprisonment of two anarchists during the 2008 Republican National Convention in Minneapolis-St. Paul. Our guest tonight, Director Jamie Meltzer, has crafted a taut tale with re-enactments that break the fourth wall, conflicting accounts of key incidents, and an unreliable, perhaps confabulist, narrator.

 

FDL Movie Night: Bomb It 2

By: Monday September 9, 2013 4:59 pm

Filmmaker Jon Reiss is a champion of street art and graffiti, and his new film, Bomb It 2, is the follow-up to his earlier global graffiti documentary, Bomb It. In Bomb It 2, Reiss–using a ultra compact camera and sound package–traveled by himself to film artists and writers representing the indigenous street art scenes in Singapore, Bangkok, Jakarta, Hong Kong, Tel Aviv, Perth, Melbourne, Copenhagen, Chicago, Austin, and the Palestinian refugee camps on the West Bank.

He explored urban landscapes and a wide range of graffiti cultures, styles and beliefs.

Manning Solidarity at Austin’s Queerbomb

By: Monday June 3, 2013 4:35 pm

The action was a success, bringing increased awareness of Manning’s case. At the end of the night when I parked the Manning float and took a rest on a bench at a nearby coffee shop, it was fun to watch people stop to pose with him for photos as they left Queerbomb.

Travis County District Attorney Released From Jail This Morning

By: Thursday May 9, 2013 7:10 pm

Travis County is home to Austin, Texas and well over a million residents. The county’s district attorney, Rosemary Lehmberg was released from jail about 1am this morning after serving half of a 45-day sentence for driving under the influence of alcohol.

Austin’s Feminist Vigilante Gang vs. Texas Rally for Life

By: Wednesday January 30, 2013 10:55 am

Saturday at the Texas Capitol, thousands (by mainstream media estimates) gathered to celebrate the war on women’s rights. Many had been bused in from around the state to reinforce the numbers in the notoriously liberal capitol city. Standing against them were a tiny group, Austin’s newly formed “Feminist Vigilante Gang.”

3 Ways Movements Spread Nonviolent Civil Disobedience

By: Saturday January 12, 2013 9:08 am

We have entered an age of protest. Social media tools allow new ways to mobilize activists into public and private spaces and also provide new avenues for amplifying their actions. The Internet, when used properly, can drive activists to an action — or a worldwide coalition of actions — and then make sure thousands more people see and hear about them after. Using simple tools like hashtags, we can monitor the response to actions in real time in a way never possible before.

Two More Austin Undercover Officers Revealed in #D12 Gulf Port 7 Trial

By: Friday November 16, 2012 7:10 pm

Judge Joan Campbell’s release reveals that a total of six undercover officers were assigned to monitor Occupy Austin, but three were apparently not involved directly in the lockbox incident where undercover Austin police built lockbox devices. Made from PVC pipes and also known as sleeping dragons or dragon sleeves, lockboxes linked seven protesters together at the December 12, 2011 Port of Houston shutdown. The use of these devices resulted in these occupiers from Austin, Dallas and Houston facing felony charges instead of the misdemeanors brought against those who simply linked their arms and legs.

Overpass Light Brigade Is Challenging Free Speech Restrictions

By: Tuesday November 13, 2012 7:18 pm

Last Monday, I attended the Austin Overpass Light Brigade’s fourth gathering. As previously reported on Firedoglake, the group had been shut down by police at its previous two attempts. The message on election eve was DO MORE THAN VOTE, and occupiers came prepared for police interference.

#Occupy Votes

By: Thursday November 8, 2012 4:01 pm

Since the Occupy movement began, many have attempted to position the group in opposition to electoral politics. Occupy in its purest form is nonpartisan, and since the beginning of the movement this has been a source of criticism.

If we want to really make a difference, we were told time and again, we should organize similarly to the Tea Party and begin to field candidates for office. When occupiers protested Mitt Romney or other hyper-conservative politicians, they’d be accused of being in bed with Barack Obama. If the movement protested neo-liberals like Obama, we were accused of being traitors to all that was good in the world because we obviously wanted Romney to win (Carnacing is not limited to blogs). Most of all, occupiers got accused of being disconnected from what their critics perceive to be real politics — we were lazy hippies who didn’t understand how the world works and worst of all we don’t vote.

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