Amnesty International Explains Why It Won’t Oppose All Drone Murders

By: Monday November 4, 2013 3:55 pm

Refusing to recognize the UN Charter, in order to appear unbiased, is a twisted notion to begin with, but perhaps it had good intentions at one time. However, now the U.N. special rapporteur finds that drones are making war the norm rather than the exception. That’s a serious shifting of the ground, and might be good reason to reconsider the ongoing feasibility of a human rights group avoiding the existence of laws against war.

What Should Be Progressive or Humanitarian Response to Suspected Chemical Attack in Syria?

By: Tuesday August 27, 2013 2:55 pm

The increasing consensus, despite the lack of incontrovertible proof, is that a chemical attack took place in Syria that killed hundreds of innocent people and the Syrian government was behind it. It is impossible to be one hundred percent certain that the Syrian President Bashar al-Assad’s government launched a chemical attack, but since it is known that Syria has a stockpile of chemical weapons, this event demonstrates that Syria could use them again if there is no response to the suspected chemical attack.

Opening the Box: Sarah Shourd on Herman Wallace, California Hunger Strikers and the Horror of Solitary Confinement

By: Sunday July 21, 2013 4:00 pm

Last month, we were devastated to learn that the Angola 3’s Herman Wallace had been diagnosed with liver cancer, and that he was continuing to be held in isolation in a locked room at Hunt Correctional Center’s prison infirmary. Reflecting on his confinement while battling cancer, Herman said: “My own body has now become a tool of torture against me.”

Melissa Harris-Perry, MSNBC on Compassionate Release for Herman Wallace of the Angola 3

By: Sunday July 7, 2013 5:20 pm

Yesterday Herman Wallace’s lawyer, Nick Trenticosta, was a guest on Melissa Harris-Perry’s MSNBC TV show, where he explained the seriousness of Herman Wallace’s diagnosis with liver cancer: “He’s lost about 55 pounds in four months, and he is being treated completely negligently. I would say he’s being killed through intentional neglect.”

Politicization of Asylum Seeking on Full Display in Case of NSA Whistleblower Edward Snowden

By: Wednesday July 3, 2013 11:15 am

“Everyone has the right to seek and to enjoy in other countries asylum from persecution,” under Article 14 under the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, however, that does not apply to individuals who have committed “non-political crimes” or “acts contrary to the purposes and principles of the United Nations.”

National Security Agency whistleblower Edward Snowden is desperately working to find some country in the world that will grant him asylum. In an airport in Moscow now for over a week, multiple countries have responded to requests but no country has agreed to grant him asylum.

Judicial Ignorance and Bias Doom Ahmed Abu Ali to Decades in Isolation in Key “War on Terror” Case

By: Saturday April 13, 2013 4:00 pm

Even as a desperate hunger strike by detainees at Guantanamo prison camp continues, with dozens in medical peril, preferring death to the lawless existence of indefinite detention and ongoing planned (or some might say, capricious) abuse, human rights and civil liberties activists often point to the Article II courts as an alternative in the prosecution of “war on terror” crimes. But an examination of actual cases prosecuted in the criminal courts shows that use of accepted rules and appeal procedures merely produce their own version of unfairness and arbitrary injustice.

Countries Subject to US Intervention Become Executioners & Impose Death Penalty

By: Friday April 12, 2013 9:41 am

Amnesty International released its annual review of death sentences and executions around the world. The review found the five biggest executors in 2012 were China, Iran, Iraq, Saudi Arabia and the USA. It also found that the number of countries that abolished the death penalty rose to 97 and progress toward abolition of the death penalty was made in “all regions of the world.”

Robert H. King: End 41 years of cruel and inhuman solitary confinement for Albert Woodfox of the Angola 3

By: Saturday March 23, 2013 4:00 pm

My name is Robert H. King. I was released on February 8, 2001 after spending 31 years in prison – 29 of them in solitary confinement at the infamous Louisiana State Prison also known as ‘Angola’.

Confined there with me were Albert Woodfox and Herman Wallace, the other two friends who make up ‘the Angola 3′. Herman and Albert have now spent 41 years in prison. And though they are no longer housed at Angola, both remain in solitary confinement at another prison – a punishment Amnesty has described as ‘cruel, inhuman and degrading’.

In 2012, Number of New Death Sentences Remained Near Historic Low

By: Thursday December 20, 2012 2:25 pm

A year-end report from the Death Penalty Information Center (DPIC) indicates the “number of new death sentences in 2012 was the second lowest since the death penalty was reinstated in 1976.” The number remained near the historic low number of death sentences in 2011.

Seventy-eight people were sentenced to death in the United States. States that had typically used the death penalty at higher rates, like North Carolina, Virginia, South Carolina and Indiana, had no new death sentences.

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