Will Col. Bogdan’s Claims of Insufficient Staffing Cause Al Qaeda to Attack Guantanamo?

By: Thursday August 8, 2013 5:17 pm

Jason Leopold, who has been filing requests for government documents like there is no tomorrow, apparently caught Department of Defense censors with their pants down. The result is a rare look into the kind of political shenanigans DoD uses to justify its policies at Guantanamo.

 

SOUTHCOM Commander Spins Latif Death Investigation to Justify Groin Searches

By: Thursday July 18, 2013 2:50 pm

As reported by Kevin Gosztola in the 17 July Dissenter, a panel of the D.C. Court of Appeals stayed Judge Royce Lamberth’s ruling overturning a search protocol at Guantanamo that included groin searches of detainees as much as four times in a single day.

Guantanamo Prisoners on Hunger Strike Against New Guard Force for Confiscating Personal Items

By: Monday March 4, 2013 3:06 pm

Most of the men imprisoned at Guantanamo Bay prison’s Camp 6 have been on hunger strike for nearly three weeks, according to their attorneys. In response to reports, the Center for Constitutional Rights (CCR) and habeas counsel have sent a letter to military officials take measures immediately to improve the situation.

The letter notes, “Since approximately February 6, 2013, camp authorities have been confiscating detainees’ personal items, including blankets, sheets, towels, mats, razors, toothbrushes, books, family photos, religious CDs, and letters, including legal mail; and restricting their exercise, seemingly without provocation or cause.” Additionally, “Arabic interpreters employed by the prison have been searching the men’s Qur’ans in ways that constitute desecration according to their religious beliefs, and that guards have been disrespectful during prayer times.”

Freedom or Death at Guantánamo

By: Friday January 25, 2013 1:45 pm

Adnan Latif and Mohammed al-Hamiri arrived at Guantánamo through strikingly similar twists of fate. Adnan Latif is the most recent of nine men – four since President Obama took office – to die in U.S. custody at Guantánamo.

Eleven Years On: Being Imprisoned at Guantanamo Worse Than Being Confined by Totalitarian State

By: Saturday January 12, 2013 12:00 pm

Eleven years ago, the United States began to imprison detainees in the Guantanamo Bay prison camps. One hundred and sixty-six prisoners remain imprisoned. One hundred and fifty-seven have not been charged with any crime. Eighty-six of the prisoners have been cleared for release. Yet, all three branches of the United States government, the vast majority of the US media, and most Americans do not seem to find the ongoing injustice at Guantanamo to be all that significant or troubling.

David Remes on the Tragic Death of Adnan Latif: What Is the Military Trying to Hide?

By: Monday December 17, 2012 3:55 pm

A few weeks ago, the US military began saying that my client Adnan Latif, a Yemeni at Guantanamo, who died in his cell on September 8, committed suicide by overdosing on medication he smuggled into his cell. On Saturday, December 15, the military further stated that acute pneumonia was a contributing factor in Adnan’s death. The government’s theory doesn’t stand up. It leaves urgent questions unanswered.

Gitmo Detainee Death Mystery Deepens With News of Drug Overdose

By: Thursday November 29, 2012 8:47 am

Charlie Savage at the New York Times reports that “several people briefed on a Naval Criminal Investigative Service inquiry” into the death of Guantanamo detainee Adnan Farhan Abdul Latif, who was found unresponsive in his cell last September, have revealed that the prisoner “died from an overdose of psychiatric medication.” Investigators are thinking suicide, but others have called the circumstances of death “murky.” The article explores other possible scenarios that could have led to a psychiatric drug overdose, including recent revelations about involuntary drugging of prisoners.

Omar Khadr Leaves Guantanamo, While Press Refuses to Report His Water Torture

By: Saturday September 29, 2012 12:45 pm

On a pre-dawn Saturday morning, September 29, the youngest prisoner in Guantanamo, Omar Khadr left the harsh US-run prison where he had been held since October 2002. At the time of his incarceration he was fifteen years old. According to a CBC report, Khadr was flown to Canadian Forces Base Trenton, where he was to be transferred to the Millhaven Institution, a maximum security prison in Bath, Ontario.

Khadr is supposed to serve out the remainder of an eight-year sentence, part of a deal his attorneys made with the U.S. government, with Khadr agreeing to plead guilty to the killing of SPC Christopher Speer during a firefight at the Ayub Kheil compound in Afghanistan, in addition to other charges such as “material support of terrorism” and spying. Khadr essentially agreed to participate in what amounted to a show trial for the penalty phase of his Military Commissions hearing. For this, he got a brokered eight year sentence, with a promise of a transfer out of Guantanamo to Canada after a year.

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