House Committees Take First Step to Reform NSA

By: Thursday May 15, 2014 5:16 pm

Last week, the House Judiciary and Intelligence committees approved a bill that would begin the process of restoring constitutional limits to dragnet government surveillance. While a praiseworthy step in the right direction, the progress to date remains both entirely too slow, and deferential to the intelligence agencies.

 

The Air Force Must Have Some Really Good Cooks

By: Saturday March 15, 2014 9:02 am

We knew that the nuclear missile crews at Minot AFB were having problems passing their readiness checks, but now we learn that the missile launch folks had their bacon saved by having their poor test scores lumped together with the missile crew cooks and facilities managers. This raises a couple of questions . . .

Obama Administration Abuses National Security, Secrecy Powers

By: Thursday February 13, 2014 6:00 pm

Would the US Government executive branch abuse its state secrets privilege, abuse the classification of documents, and use its ability to prevent a foreign national’s entry to the US to bar her access to the court system? Would it spend millions of taxpayer dollars on lawyers improperly?

FDL Movie Night: Money for Nothing: Inside the Federal Reserve

By: Monday September 23, 2013 4:59 pm

The Federal Reserve is a hundred years old this year. There’s not a whole lot to celebrate in its century long history–the intention might have been good, but the execution has kind of been disastrous. In tonight’s film, Money for Nothing: Inside the Federal Reserve, our guest filmmaker Jim Bruce takes us through the history of the Federal Reserve System and into the current mess.

Calls for Iraq War Accountability Amid Syria Debate

By: Friday September 13, 2013 2:30 pm

As the country has been debating military intervention in Syria, the airwaves and blogosphere, conversations on the street and phone calls to Congress have rightly been filled with talk of the catastrophe caused by the Iraq War. A decade after the invasion, Iraqis and U.S. veterans are still suffering from the impacts of the war, including widespread trauma and skyrocketing rates of birth defects and cancer from the U.S.’s own use of internationally condemned weapons, such as white phosphorous, napalm-class weapons and weapons containing depleted uranium.

This week, a coalition of veterans, Iraqis and human rights groups are appealing to the United Nations Human Rights Council and the Organization of American States to urge concrete U.S. action for the devastation it has imposed.

Government by Platitude

By: Sunday May 19, 2013 9:00 am

A society where knowledge is irrelevant, replaced by focus-group tested slogans and canned talking points created by and for a bunch of rich people isn’t a democracy.

FDL Book Salon Welcomes Robert Kuttner, Debtors’ Prison: The Politics of Austerity Versus Possibility

By: Saturday May 4, 2013 1:59 pm

Robert Kuttner’s Debtors’ Prison ties together many of the individual fights progressives are battling over into a general argument for why our economy is broken 5 years after the Great Recession began. There are those fighting both Republicans and some Democrats on topics ranging from austerity to foreclosure relief and financial sector accountability, while there are fellow activists in Europe fighting against the European Central Bank’s policy of tight money and anti-democratic takeovers of local policy.

Killing Us Softly

By: Wednesday March 13, 2013 4:48 pm

Last week, Senator Rand Paul (R-TX) forced a long overdue conversation in Washington about checks and balances on executive power. Yet few observers recognize the ultimate importance of his actions, or why the Senate’s confirmation of the new CIA director remained premature.

Justice Department Must Do More for Victims of the Financial Crisis Than Just Sue Standard & Poors

By: Tuesday February 26, 2013 6:43 am

We’re happy to see the Department of Justice take Standard & Poor’s to court — but this civil suit represents just a small step in holding Wall Street accountable for the 2008 financial crisis.

What the Sequester Fight Shows About the Bipartisan Fetish

By: Wednesday February 20, 2013 1:40 pm

The sequester was created in the most bipartisan way possible. It was a proposal from a Democratic President to find a way around an impasse with House Republicans that both sides each believed would eventually advance their long-term agendas. It was approved by a Republican House, a Democratic Senate and signed by a Democratic President. As a result, everyone will agree this is a truly horrible policy that will needlessly hurt the country, but no one responsible for it will probably ever pay a political price.

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