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Jeff Kaye

About Me:
Jeffrey Kaye is a psychologist in private practice in San Francisco, where he works with adults and couples in psychotherapy. He worked over 10 years professionally with torture victims and asylum applicants. Active in the anti-torture movement since 2006, he has his own blog, Invictus. He has published previously at Truthout, Alternet, and The Public Record.
 
Website:
http://my.firedoglake.com/members/valtin/
About Me:
Jeffrey Kaye is a psychologist in private practice in San Francisco, where he works with adults and couples in psychotherapy. He worked over 10 years professionally with torture victims and asylum applicants. Active in the anti-torture movement since 2006, he has his own blog, Invictus. He has published previously at Truthout, Alternet, and The Public Record.

“A growing feeling here that death is the road out of Guantanamo”

By: Wednesday March 6, 2013 6:35 pm

“What would you do if your brother or uncle was kidnapped, sold, and beaten in a prison for 11 years without charge?”

So says the question prominently posted at a Facebook site (“Free Fayiz and Fawzi”) dedicated to the two remaining Kuwaiti prisoners at Guantanamo, 36-year-old Fayiz Al-Kandari and 35-year-old Fawzi Al-Odah. Both men have been in Guantanamo for over ten years. Neither of them have ever been charged in any court with any wrongdoing. Both men were doing charitable work in Afghanistan when they were caught up in the chaos after 9/11 and the subsequent U.S. attack there.

Serious Questions About Wikileaks’ Release of Purported Guantanamo SOP

By: Tuesday February 26, 2013 5:53 am

The non-coverage of Wikileaks’ “Detainee Policies” on interrogation documents after their initial release is in itself astounding, but even more surprising is the fact that when examined some of the documents don’t appear to be what they are claimed to be. What follows is analysis, with response by both Wikileaks and DoD.

DHS Says FBI “Possibly Funded” Terrorist Group

By: Thursday February 21, 2013 10:46 am

Someone at the Department of Homeland Security website dedicated to studying terrorism thought they should do their job and really describe terrorist groups, including one funded by the FBI. The Secret Army Organization was involved in domestic bombings, break-ins, and assassination, while one of its top leaders

New Document Details Arguments About Torture at a JSOC Prison

By: Tuesday January 29, 2013 2:40 pm

Journalist Michael Otterman, author of the excellent book, American Torture: From the Cold War to Abu Ghraib and Beyond, was kind enough to forward to me some months ago a document he obtained via the Freedom of Information Act. The document consists of the after-action reports made by Colonel Steven Kleinman and Terrence Russell, two of the three team members sent by the Joint Personnel Recovery Agency (JPRA) to a top-secret special operations facility in Iraq in September 2003.

David Remes on the Tragic Death of Adnan Latif: What Is the Military Trying to Hide?

By: Monday December 17, 2012 3:55 pm

A few weeks ago, the US military began saying that my client Adnan Latif, a Yemeni at Guantanamo, who died in his cell on September 8, committed suicide by overdosing on medication he smuggled into his cell. On Saturday, December 15, the military further stated that acute pneumonia was a contributing factor in Adnan’s death. The government’s theory doesn’t stand up. It leaves urgent questions unanswered.

Gitmo Detainee’s Body Returned to Yemen, New Details on His Death Revealed

By: Sunday December 16, 2012 8:35 am

U.S. Southern Command (SOUTHCOM) reported that the body of Allal Ab-Aljallil Abd al-Rahman Abd (aka Adnan Farhan Abdul Latif) was repatriated to Yemen. The SOUTHCOM statement did not indicate the date or time the body was returned, nor who received the remains.

Gitmo Detainee Death Mystery Deepens With News of Drug Overdose

By: Thursday November 29, 2012 8:47 am

Charlie Savage at the New York Times reports that “several people briefed on a Naval Criminal Investigative Service inquiry” into the death of Guantanamo detainee Adnan Farhan Abdul Latif, who was found unresponsive in his cell last September, have revealed that the prisoner “died from an overdose of psychiatric medication.” Investigators are thinking suicide, but others have called the circumstances of death “murky.” The article explores other possible scenarios that could have led to a psychiatric drug overdose, including recent revelations about involuntary drugging of prisoners.

Anti-Torture Psychologists Respond to Attack From APA Division Chief

By: Wednesday November 7, 2012 7:13 pm

The battle within the American Psychological Association (APA) to bring that organization into line with other human rights groups and attorney organizations in opposing the use of psychological personnel in national security interrogations accelerated last month when a prominent APA official came out strongly against a petition to annul APA’s ethics policy on national security and interrogations.

Government’s Psychological Evaluation of Manssor Arbabsiar Fails to Impress

By: Tuesday October 9, 2012 5:00 pm

Arbabsiar is Iranian-born, but a U.S. naturalized citizen, a Texas used car salesman with a cousin in the Iranian Quds force. According to U.S. prosecutors, in 2011, Arbabsiar contacted a confidential DEA informant in Mexico, and, believing he was talking to someone in a Mexican drug cartel, arranged the assassination of Saudi ambassador Adel al-Jubeir. But the assassination and other alleged terrorist plots, of course, never took place, and Arbabsiar was detained in Mexico, flown to the U.S. and interrogated by the FBI at (it turns out) an undisclosed military base from September 29 to October 10, 2011.

Omar Khadr Leaves Guantanamo, While Press Refuses to Report His Water Torture

By: Saturday September 29, 2012 12:45 pm

On a pre-dawn Saturday morning, September 29, the youngest prisoner in Guantanamo, Omar Khadr left the harsh US-run prison where he had been held since October 2002. At the time of his incarceration he was fifteen years old. According to a CBC report, Khadr was flown to Canadian Forces Base Trenton, where he was to be transferred to the Millhaven Institution, a maximum security prison in Bath, Ontario.

Khadr is supposed to serve out the remainder of an eight-year sentence, part of a deal his attorneys made with the U.S. government, with Khadr agreeing to plead guilty to the killing of SPC Christopher Speer during a firefight at the Ayub Kheil compound in Afghanistan, in addition to other charges such as “material support of terrorism” and spying. Khadr essentially agreed to participate in what amounted to a show trial for the penalty phase of his Military Commissions hearing. For this, he got a brokered eight year sentence, with a promise of a transfer out of Guantanamo to Canada after a year.

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