NBC Changes Story on Israeli Bombing of Hospital

This morning Israeli forces bombed Al Shifa hospital in Gaza. As reports began to circulate via twitter, several tweets referenced the above tweet from NBC News.

The same account was included on the NBC website report as of 11:04 AM Central time:

The report reads:

The Israel Defense Forces told Haaretz that a “preliminary investigation has found that Israeli army did not fire at the Shifa Hospital, and the fire is believed to have been Hamaz.” The IDF could not immediately be reached to clarify that account on Monday. However, a NBC News journalist witnessed the attack on the hospital and said it had been fired by an Israeli drone.

Israel has been criticized for several strikes which hit hospitals in the Gaza Strip during its recent offensive.

Only about 20 minutes later, NBC had changed its story to delete the mention of the NBC journalist’s report and insert:

Early reports from the ground had said an Israeli drone appeared responsible for the attack.

The story has been changed now once again to include both an IDF statement and a Hamas statement but no mention of their own reporter’s witness though they do mention their presence on the scene:

The explosion near Shifa Hospital around 5 p.m. local time (10 a.m. ET) caused some damage to the outpatient clinic, according to witnesses including an NBC News crew on the ground in the area.

No mentions are made in the story or on the site that the report has been changed or updated. The report is now credited to Ayman Mohyeldin, Paul Ziad Nassar and Alexander Smith with contributions from Hasani Gittens and Reuters. Note that Ayman Mohyeldin is the reporter NBC has removed from Gaza for being a bit too truthful and just recently reinstated.

So what’s the real story NBC?

Heartbreaking Eid in Palestine

If you have been following the war on Gaza via twitter, you are probably aware of a new web initiative called Humanize Palestine. It’s a collection of photos and notes about many of the men, women and children who have fallen to Israeli bullets and bombs over the past few days – and it is heartbreaking.

The anonymous site organizers note:

Why is it that when an Israeli goes missing or is killed, the media presents images of them from a happier time? They are usually smiling in these images or posing next to their family and friends. This helps create empathy in our hearts and connect with the person in the image on a deeper, more personal level. But when a Palestinian child is killed, images of their burned and mutilated bodies is circulated, and we immediately connect brown and Palestinian bodies with death and disposability. That person is stripped away from an identity, a family and loved ones, and a story.

Humanize Palestine attempts to honor the deceased as martyrs by bringing them back to life through their pictures, stories, art, and poetry. Humanize Palestine reminds us, that contrary to Western bias, a Palestinian life is no less valuable than the life of another, by giving the life the respect and dignity that it deserves.

Humanize Palestine includes the dead from the West Bank, nine of whom have been killed so far by IDF and by Settlers, as they protest in support of Gaza.

Today is Eid, the day when Muslims finish the fast of Ramadan. It should be a day of celebration but this year, it is a day with so much sorrow. For Eid, Muslims gather together, visit friends and family and share meals and gifts. I hope that today we can take a few moments to honor Eid as well.

There is much we can say, much we want to say about this war on Gaza, about our country’s role in the attack on Gaza and about what must be done. Yet today I hope we can find the time to simply pause and remember each who has died. Take a moment to look at the photos and stories of Humanize Palestine, read and pray or meditate in your own way about the individuals whose eyes greet you in the photos and do not let them be forgotten.

When Is a Ceasefire Not a Ceasefire?

Today has been a confusing day with news of a 12 hour humanitarian ceasefire followed by talk of a four hour extension that may or may not have been accepted by Israel and was rejected by Hamas – and now, as I write, talk of a new 24 hour ceasefire.

While Israeli forces warned Gazans not to go to their home areas during the ceasefire, many did and the images and news are devastating with over 1000 dead, over 5000 injured and likely more in the rubble.

From various twitter reports, the potential four hour extension either ended with some Hamas rockets heading towards Tel Aviv or with Israeli troops shooting and killing a Palestinian. Clearly we don’t know.

And reports are surging of Israeli attacks on a Gaza refugee camp – including a school as I type.

https://twitter.com/GabrielHelou/status/493157317173465088

One thing does seem clear. While Israel refuses to discuss the secret Egyptian offer which is rumored to have some Gaza friendly terms and no one seems to even notice the Hamas offer of a ten year ceasefire if basic rights are honored and the seige is lifted, Israel gets all the credit for agreeing to any ceasefire – even though they were using it as cover for their continued destruction of the Hamas built tunnels or as the Financial Times writes:

Israel’s army continued its work on Hamas tunnels on Saturday, a government official said, even during the pause in fighting.

And in the BBC’s new report, Israel agrees to 24-hour Gaza ceasefire:

Hamas said it wanted a complete stop to fighting and an end to Gaza’s blockade.

“Any humanitarian calm that does not include the withdrawal of occupation soldiers from the Gaza Strip and enable the people to return to their houses and to evacuate the wounded is not acceptable,” Hamas spokesman Sami Abu Zuhri told Reuters.

Israel said that it would continue operations against tunnels used by Hamas during this period.

The LA Times has more than most:

Even during the initial daylight cease-fire, Israeli troops continued working to destroy Hamas-dug “attack” tunnels, the army said…

Israel’s insistence that such operations continue during any longer cease-fire has been a key sticking point to efforts to hammer out a weeklong truce, which would take place in tandem with negotiations on the two sides’ demands.

Al Jazeera has an in-depth interview with Osama Hamdan, “one of Hamas’ senior leaders and head of foreign relations” and it includes a lot of information we are not getting elsewhere:

Hamdan: If the [ceasefire] initiative includes what we are asking for, then we will deal with it positively and we may go to the ceasefire directly. 

I think Kerry understands more than anyone how the Israelis are playing games. They say yes and then they do nothing. 

So he has to be clear with them, and he also has to give guarantees that the Israeli side will deliver what will be asked of them.

AJ: There is international pressure to immediately accept a humanitarian truce, rather than waiting for a long-term ceasefire that specifically requests that the siege be lifted. What is your response?

Hamdan: Accepting an immediate truce will not solve the problem. If they are talking about a humanitarian ceasefire, part of that will have to do with lifting the siege. 

We cannot talk about a humanitarian solution while there is a blockade on Gaza, where we do not have medicine, essential needs, and reconstruction materials entering Gaza.

You cannot put Palestinians in a jail and tell them to live quietly.

And when asked whether Hamas is ok with Egypt’s involvement:

There were agreements in 2012 and 2009 supervised by the Egyptians as well. There was the prisoners exchange deal in 2011; all those agreements were violated by the Israelis. So the problem is that Israel believes that no one is questioning anything they are doing.

If Kerry wants to achieve a real ceasefire, he has to find a way to pressure Israel to stop its occupation.

Read the whole interview here – it’s the side of the news not being told.

Meanwhile, today in Chicago:

West Bank Marches on Night of Power

By now you may have heard that there was a Palestinian march and at least two people were shot last night on the West Bank. You may not know why this matters so much.

Let’s take a closer look at what happened and why last night was special.

Last night was the Laylatul Qadr, the “Night of Power” or “Night of Light” for Muslims. This night, toward the end of Ramadan, marks the night when the Quran was first revealed to Mohammed.

Just as the arrival of a child is celebrated, on its birth and then every year, as a bringer of joy and fullfilment for the family, Laylatul Qadr is celebrated as a bringer of light and guidance for mankind. Unlike the birthday which is celebrated with a feast for the senses, Laylatul Qadr includes a feast for the spirit, a feast of worship and prayers.”

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For this night of prayer, there was a call in the West Bank for an attempt to go to the Al Aqsa Mosque to pray:

In response, according to the Jerusalem Post:

West Bank Marches on Night of Power

By now you may have heard that there was a Palestinian march and at least two people were shot last night on the West Bank. You may not know why this matters so much.

Let’s take a closer look at what happened and why last night was special.

Last night was the Laylatul Qadr, the “Night of Power” or “Night of Light” for Muslims. This night, toward the end of Ramadan, marks the night when the Quran was first revealed to Mohammed.

Just as the arrival of a child is celebrated, on its birth and then every year, as a bringer of joy and fullfilment for the family, Laylatul Qadr is celebrated as a bringer of light and guidance for mankind. Unlike the birthday which is celebrated with a feast for the senses, Laylatul Qadr includes a feast for the spirit, a feast of worship and prayers.

For this night of prayer, there was a call in the West Bank for an attempt to go to the Al Aqsa Mosque to pray:

In response, according to the Jerusalem Post:

Citing anonymous threats of Arab rioting expected near Damascus Gate, National Police spokesman Micky Rosenfeld said Thursday that hundreds of officers will be on hand near the east Jerusalem entrance Friday to ensure no incidents take place…??To that end, Rosenfeld said no Arabs under 50-years-old will be permitted to enter Damascus Gate, and undercover teams and various other elite units will blanket the area to respond immediately to any violence.

Interview from Ramallah

The audio link above is an interview by the San Francisco based Arab Talk Radio with Diane Buttu from in the midst of the demonstration. It is extraordinary reporting and Diane not only explains what’s happening but does a brilliant job of providing the context for why it’s so important. It’s really essential listening.

There has been a perception that the Palestinian people are divided and Israel has depended on the West Bank remaining relatively quiet while it pours all it’s destructive might into the war on Gaza.

Last night instead, the West Bank came out in large numbers and the message of unity and support for Gaza was very clear. By most accounts, the demonstrations were the largest since the 1980s and even greater numbers are expected after Friday prayers and in the coming days. Today, Friday, is Al-Quds Day, a day set aside to remember the people of Palestine and call for an end to their oppression and that of all oppressed peoples, so it has special significance as well. (Al-Quds events are held worldwide and you can look here to find ones in your area if you would like to participate. People of all or no faiths are welcome.)

Containing these marches will prove difficult – as 972 noted:

The West Bank march quickly spread to East Jerusalem, where police were said to be clashing with protesters in the Old City, Silwan, and other neighborhoods. Protests were also reported in Nablus and Bethlehem.

As the night ended, reports of casualties included:

Two Palestinians were shot dead by Israeli forces late Thursday as over 10,000 marched from a Ramallah-area refugee camp toward Jerusalem in protest against Israel’s Gaza offensive, a Ma’an reporter at the scene said.??The slain Palestinians were identified as 19-year-old Mohammad al-Araj and 27-year-old Majd Sufyan, a Ma’an reporter at the scene said.??At least 108 Palestinians have been injured by Israeli fire during the march, at least 60 of them with live bullets.??Earlier, Palestinians marched from al-Amari refugee camp toward Qalandia checkpoint, a militarized crossing point between Ramallah and Jerusalem through Israel’s separation wall.??Soldiers shot live fire and rubber-coated steel bullets into the crowd, in addition to tear gas.

The toll in Gaza meanwhile was reported to have reached 807 dead, after one of the bloodiest days so far. As I post this early Friday morning Central time, this report appears:

Silencing the Children of Gaza

The video above is an ad produced by the Israeli human rights group, B’Tselem, in which the names of the children killed in Gaza are read. B’Tselem attempted to buy ad time on Israeli radio but were refused:

More than 600 Palestinians have been killed during the fighting in Gaza so far, including more than 150 children. Yet Israeli media is barely covering the story, other than mentioning the number of casualties. To encourage public debate in Israel on the issue, B’Tselem asked to purchase a spot on IBA Radio in order to have the names of some of the children killed read out. The radio refused, on the grounds that reading out the names of Palestinian children killed in Gaza is politically ‘controversial.’ Yet the refusal is, in itself, far from neutral: it is a powerful statement in favor of silencing public debate over the massive price that Gazan civilians are paying for this operation.

Yet while some voices are silenced, Israeli officials are not only encouraging but in fact paying others. In a report in USA Today from last summer we learned that Israeli students are offered full or part scholarships in return for posting pro-Israel comments on social media that align with government positions.

Of course, it’s not only paid posters who scramble to toe the line.

And while the propaganda wars play out, today in Gaza, a UN School in Beit Hanoun was once again shelled by Israel:

At least 15 people have been reported killed and 200 injured in the Israeli shelling of a UN school in northern Gaza which was being used as a shelter from fierce clashes on the streets outside.

… Robert Turner, the director for UNRWA told Al Jazeera there was no warning from the Israelis before the shells landed. ‘This is a designated emergency shelter,’ he said. ‘The location was conveyed to the Israelis.

‘This was an installation we were managing, that monitored [to ensure] that our neutrality was maintained.’

Multiple western journalists reported the same – including Dan Rivers of ITV:

I just can’t get over what I have just witnessed at the Kamal Odwan hospital in #Gaza so many injured children

and the BBC:

Correspondents say pools of blood lay on the ground in the courtyard of the school in Beit Hanoun in northern Gaza.

There was a large scorch mark where it appeared a shell had hit, the Associated Press news agency reports.

As the reaction grew to this news — and the photos of the killed and wounded spread (see this from NBC News for example) — the IDF issued a belated series of claims, first that:

In recent days, Hamas has fired rockets from an area of Beit Hanoun where an UNRWA shelter is located.

And then:

Last night, we told Red Cross to evacuate civilians from UNRWA’s shelter in Beit Hanoun btw 10 am & 2 pm. UNRWA & Red Cross got the message.

Then:

Today Hamas continued firing from Beit Hanoun. The IDF responded by targeting the source of the fire.

And finally:

Also today, several rockets launched from Gaza toward Israel fell short and hit Beit Hanoun.

Given that UNRWA says specifically that:

…during the course of the day they had been trying to negotiate a window of time with the Israeli army for civilians to leave the area because of the heaving fighting.

But Chris Gunness, a spokesman for the UN Relief and Works Agency for Palestine refugees (Unrwa), said it was never granted.

And that all other reports were of Israeli shelling not a rocket, it’s hard to take the IDF at their word.

Gazans Explain What They Want From Any Ceasefire

The news today is full of talk about John Kerry going to Cairo and insisting on a ceasefire in the war on Gaza. Obama’s UN Ambassador, Samantha Power, who normally is a warrior for R2P made the same argument at the United Nations, also calling for a ceasefire – though mostly from the Gazans since she began by stressing Israel’s right to self-defense. Of course, no one mentions the Palestinians right to same.

All this comes as Israel continues to level neighbrhoods in Gaza, house by house, with hospitals and girls’ schools thrown in today. Israel justifies this destruction by pointing to Gaza’s refusal of an earlier ceasefire – one that no one discussed with Gaza.

Yet we are supposed to approve of all this because Egypt is involved, as if Egypt is somehow a representative and faithful advocate for the Palestinian people – ignoring the role of the Egyptian military and current leaders in the blockade for which they receive a nice aid check from the US.

Given Israel’s poor record of honoring any restraints on its military actions – here’s one list last updated in 2013 that gives some sense of the scope even if we are unable to confirm all instances: Full List of 287 Documented Israeli Cease Fire Violations – trust in Israeli intentions is not high amongst Gazans. Those incidents are rarely mentioned.

No mention as well is made in our press of the offer from Gaza for a ten year cease fire – nor of Hamas’ record of mostly honoring cease fires when agreed. Writing at Mondoweiss, Francesca Albanese provides a helpful and detailed look at this offer:

Much less noticed by the Western media was that Hamas and Islamic Jihad had meanwhile proposed a 10 year truce on the basis of 10 – very reasonable – conditions. While Israel was too busy preparing for the ground invasion, why didn’t anyone in the diplomatic community spend a word about this proposal? The question is all the more poignant as this proposal was in essence in line with what many international experts as well as the United Nations have asked for years now, and included some aspects that Israel had already considered as feasible requests in the past.

The main demands of this proposal revolve around lifting the Israeli siege in Gaza through the opening of its borders with Israel to commerce and people, the establishment of an international seaport and airport under U.N. supervision, the expansion of the permitted fishing zone in the Gaza sea to 10 kilometers, and the revitalization of Gaza industrial zone. None of these demands is new.

Today we have another message from Gaza, again being ignored in the PR of Kerry and Powers and all – a message from a broad group of Gaza based “academics, public figures and activists.” Reported in the Palestine Telegraph, a digital report launched during Operation Cast Lead, these Gazans:

call for a ceasefire with Israel only if conditioned on an end to the blockade and the restoration of basic freedoms that have been denied to the people for more than seven years.

Our foremost concerns are not only the health and safety of the people in our communities, but also the quality of their lives – their ability to live free of fear of imprisonment without due process, to support their families through gainful employment, and to travel to visit their relatives and further their education.  These are fundamental human aspirations that have been severely limited for the Palestinian people for 47 years, but that have been particularly deprived from residents of Gaza since 2007.  We have been pushed beyond the limits of what a normal person can be expected to endure.

And pointed out that a return to the status quo “would mean a return to a living death” they detail their demands:

Therefore, we call for a ceasefire only when negotiated conditions result in the following:
•    Freedom of movement of Palestinians in and out of the Gaza Strip.
•    Unlimited import and export of supplies and goods, including by land, sea and air.
•    Unrestricted use of the Gaza seaport.
•    Monitoring and enforcement of these agreements by a body appointed by the United Nations, with appropriate security measures.

That surely doesn’t seem too much to ask.

Israel Tries New Rationale for War

Watching Operation Protective Edge move from a few air strikes to invasion and decimation of the land and people of Palestine is so reminiscent of Cast Lead and the horrors we covered then. But there’s a new theme to this round of genocide – the Israeli claim that Hamas has a huge network of tunnels enabling Hamas “terrorists” to attack Israeli locations virtually at will.

A girl with Palestine flag face paint
“Why, if Hamas leadership is underground, are the Israeli forces shelling family homes?”

This tunnel tale has been popping up throughout the coverage over the past few days and Israel is now saying destroying the tunnels is their primary reason for their war on Gaza rather than the rockets touted last week. Of course, if you look closely at the coverage, all the tunnel information comes from Israeli official sources, not from independent analysts or reporters’ own investigation. Take a look at Time magazine, distributing the IDF’s video of how to destroy a tunnel or check out the Washington Post doing an in-depth look at the “terror tunnels” conveniently following the IDFs press briefing on the topic on July 19th and based in large part on the “reporting” of “al-Monitor’s Shlomi Eldar.” Eldar’s orginal article portrays the tunnels as an elaborate infrastructure involving not only the smuggling tunnels we’ve all seen and which were primarily destroyed by Egypt last year but also two other types of tunnels – one to store weapons and serve as a vast underground hideaway for Hamas leaders and their families and the third, a network of tunnels that reach deep into Israel:

It was only after 13 militants from the Izz ad-Din al-Qassam Brigades penetrated Israel in an attempt to launch a terrorist attack in Kerem Shalom that the Israel Defense Forces (IDF) got the green light to begin a ground assault. And it was only then that soldiers discovered there was an underground Gaza just like there was an aboveground Gaza, and that the Hamas movement had invested an enormous amount of resources into constructing that underground Gaza.

The second network of tunnels is complex and has multiple branches running off it. This network, which was burrowed beneath the cities and refugee camps of Gaza — Khan Yunis, Rafah, Jabaliya, and Shatti — was designed to hide the stockpile of rockets and launchers. At the same time, other tunnels were dug to provide protection to Hamas leaders and allow them mobility. Every single leader of Hamas, from its lowest ranking bureaucrats to its most senior leaders, is intimately familiar with the route to the security tunnel assigned to him and his family. The most senior leadership has its own specific tunnel, which serves as a ‘war room’ in times of emergency, such as the current military campaign in the Gaza Strip.

Then there are the tunnels along the border with Israel. These were intended to allow Hamas activists from the Gaza Strip to infiltrate deep into Israeli territory. Israel had already established a security fence along its border with Gaza, which has successfully prevented countless terrorist infiltrations and attacks. So the border tunnels were dug beneath the fence.

Notice how this account – quickly picked up by western press – serves several purposes. At a time when opposition to Israel’s attack on Gaza was growing, the tunnels provide a new rationale, a new reason why Israel must attack – to shut down this newly uncovered “terrorist” access to Israel even though there had been no uptick of attacks in Israeli controlled locations prior to the attack on Gaza and none of the reporters have seen this “underground Gaza.”

Second this tale expands the Israeli line that Hamas does not represent the people of Gaza nor share their suffering – they are all hiding out in their individual tunnels with their families.

And Eldar goes on to write that – again picked up and quoted by various western media – not only has Hamas selfishly only looked after their own safety but they have squandered millions of dollars to do so which could have been spent to improve the lot of Gazan citizens. Here’s Terrence McCoy in WaPo quoting Eldar:

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FDL Book Salon Welcomes Kim Stanley Robinson, Shaman

Welcome Kim Stanley Robinson (KimStanleyRobinson) and Host Siun

Shaman (novel)

What a treat for us to once again have Kim Stanley Robinson as our guest for the Firedoglake Book Salon. Many of you will remember our discussion last year of Robinson’s 2312 in which he took us 300 years into the future all the while teaching us so much about this very moment. In his new novel, Shaman, he takes us 30,000 years back, to Pleistocene times, the Ice Age, a transitional time in the long slow evolution of humans and our earth home. And yet, while the time zones differ dramatically, the heart of this new novel is very close to that of 2312 and again, to this moment of now.

Shaman tells the story of Loon, a young shaman in the making who we first meet as he sets out on his wander. Fourteen years old, sent naked and alone into the land to survive and learn for fourteen days. As we slip into Loon’s experience, we begin to see his world in stunning detail as Niall Alexander highlighted in this excerpt:

The blue of the sky throbbed with different blues, each more blue than the next. The clouds in the blue were scalloped and articulated like driftwood, and crawled around in themselves like otters at play. [Loon] could see everything at once. His spirit kept tugging at the top of his head, lifting him so that he had to concentrate to keep his balance. The problem made him laugh. The world was so great, so beautiful. Something like a lion: it would kill you if it could, but in the meantime it was so very, very beautiful. He would have cried at how beautiful it was, but he was laughing too much, he was too happy at being there walking in it.

This wonder at the world “so great, so beautiful” is, for me the heart of Robinson’s work – from Wild Shore to today’s Shaman. Whether we are looking back from the future in nostalgia at an earth not yet devastated or forward from the Loon’s Ice Age, he reminds us to look – deeply, beyond sight looking at this amazing planet of ours and to cry and laugh with Loon at the wonder of it all.

And yet Robinson does not simply remind us of the wonder of the world around us but also of the wonder of the worlds that are we humans. In Shaman, the human is stripped back to the core, emotions and actions so closely intertwined, experience so direct and clear.

Before this book, I have always shied away from tales of early peoples as most seemed almost cliché romances of “primitives.” In this novel, Loon and his clan are never cliché. Robinson has instead found a voice that seems right for our pre-modern brothers and sisters, fueled by the senses, reminding us to pay attention in ways we’ve slipped away from. This call to attention, to notice the small moments and sensations, to revel in the sheer physicality becomes for me not a romance of the past but a lesson to be learned again, now. Robinson invites us – particularly in the first half of Shaman – to take the time to experience the world as Loon does. He is not afraid to ask us to slow down and walk beside Loon as we read — and perhaps learn again how to slow down in our world too.

In an essay about the influences that shaped Shaman, Robinson writes of his fascination with Ice Age man, in particular the discovery of “a five thousand year-old body [that] emerged from a glacier in the Alps in 1991,” which led to thoughts about how much he was or was not like us today.

And it felt like part of my science fiction work, because in imagining what we might become in the future, it seemed more and more important to understand how we got the way? we are now; and that happened in the ice age. That’s when we evolved into what we are.

And somehow at this center of what we are is memory. In Shaman, the power and importance of memory weaves throughout the book from Thorn’s insistence that Loon preserve his people’s tales and chants, to the paintings that link these ancestors to us today. In Shaman, memory is personal but also communal and this looking back 30,000 years makes us think hard about but also feel the connection to our earlier selves, rediscovering a shared knowledge, shared memories of what it is to be human on this earth. Or as Alan Cheuse wrote in his review of Shaman for NPR:

Maybe it’s because the world he creates feels so authentic and complete, but for several nights running, something happened to me that’s never happened to me before, in all the years I’ve been reading novels. I dreamed I was living in Loon’s world, traveling in the same tribe, along streams and rivers, through forest and over hills in an ancient state of mind.

Please join me in welcoming Stan back to FDL – and in the pleasure that is this wonderful new book, Shaman. (more…)

FDL Book Salon Welcomes Kim Stanley Robinson, Shaman

Welcome Kim Stanley Robinson (KimStanleyRobinson) and Host Siun

Shaman (novel)

What a treat for us to once again have Kim Stanley Robinson as our guest for the Firedoglake Book Salon. Many of you will remember our discussion last year of Robinson’s 2312 in which he took us 300 years into the future all the while teaching us so much about this very moment. In his new novel, Shaman, he takes us 30,000 years back, to Pleistocene times, the Ice Age, a transitional time in the long slow evolution of humans and our earth home. And yet, while the time zones differ dramatically, the heart of this new novel is very close to that of 2312 and again, to this moment of now.

Shaman tells the story of Loon, a young shaman in the making who we first meet as he sets out on his wander. Fourteen years old, sent naked and alone into the land to survive and learn for fourteen days. As we slip into Loon’s experience, we begin to see his world in stunning detail as Niall Alexander highlighted in this excerpt:

(more…)