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Ruth Calvo

About Me:
I've blogged at The Seminal for about two years, was at cabdrollery for around three. I live in N.TX., worked for Sen.Yarborough of TX after graduation from Wellesley, went on to receive award in playwriting, served on MD Arts Council after award, then managed a few campaigns in MD and served as assistant to a member of the MD House for several years, have worked in legal offices and written for magazines, now am retired but addicted to politics, and join gladly in promoting liberals and liberal policies.
 
Website:
http://my.firedoglake.com/members/ruthcalvo/
About Me:
I've blogged at The Seminal for about two years, was at cabdrollery for around three. I live in N.TX., worked for Sen.Yarborough of TX after graduation from Wellesley, went on to receive award in playwriting, served on MD Arts Council after award, then managed a few campaigns in MD and served as assistant to a member of the MD House for several years, have worked in legal offices and written for magazines, now am retired but addicted to politics, and join gladly in promoting liberals and liberal policies.

Sunday Food: Turkey Leftovers

By: Sunday November 30, 2014 7:00 am

I always had a rush of the mania to get the meat off the bone shortly after the dishes came back to the kitchen, and making the whole clean-up a mass project that got over with when the dishes were ready to go back into the cabinets. I have, however, seen a platter still full of the turkey remains in some refrigerators into the weekend and suggest that – “It’s dead, Jim.” Do whatever it takes, but it needs to go out somehow.

Hope your Thanksgiving feast was enjoyable, and your leftovers just as fine.

Saturday Art: The Southern Cross

By: Saturday November 29, 2014 4:00 pm

This post is a change of pace, and deals with one of the inspirations of art and a part of the reason I wanted to make a visit to the southern continent, a sight I wanted to see and one that’s had meaning for many of us who travel there.

A great treat you experience when visiting in the MesoAmerican area, where the Maya that I’ve talked about for several months held sway, is the sight at night of The Southern Cross. A remarkable constellation, the Southern Cross has been more than a guide sailors and travelers have used to find their way. The Maya were particularly schooled in the sky and its features, and showed knowledge and understanding that Europeans adopted to inform their own reckonings.

Over Easy

By: Thursday November 27, 2014 12:59 pm

The community that began with Southern Dragon’s Lakeside Diner continues. Today we collect news from outside the usual, and renew the discussion.

The killing of an Afghan policeman has been avenged by his family in the western Afghanistan province of Farah. His mother, a daughter and daughter-in-law took up arms to retaliate after his was killed.

Food Sunday: Guacamole

By: Sunday November 23, 2014 9:20 am

The holidays are a perfect time to put together a nice dip, and to my taste nothing is as good as guacamole. It’s something that should be prepared close to the time of eating, so the first step is getting avocados and letting them get ripe. Then, you can put together a delicious, and healthy, treat.

Saturday Art and Archaeology: Mayan Dynasty of Copán

By: Saturday November 22, 2014 5:30 pm

While the stories of the rulers are laid out in the hieroglyphic stairway at Copán, a few stand out in its history. The city had been important but little is known about the ruling house before it returned from obscurity, not well interpreted from early writings, and was re-established in A.D. 426.

Sunday Food: Raclette Toasting

By: Sunday November 16, 2014 5:20 pm

You may have already stumbled upon this delicious Alpine dish, often a group cooking activity, that you put together yourself from a few ingredients. The ingredients themselves came as a surprise to me, and all sounds delicious, but I have yet to adventure into raclette making, raclette being both ”a type of cheese and a Swiss dish based on heating the cheese and scraping off the melted part.”

Saturday Art and Architecture: La Cieba, the Sacred Tree of the Maya

By: Saturday November 15, 2014 4:09 pm

In the Mayan culture, a tree held sacred and often represented in artistic renderings throughout its structures, the Kapok, or Cieba Tree was part of ceremonies and life. The tree when young has a jade green trunk with many sharp thorns, and grows to be about 200 feet in maturity. Its umbrella shaped foliage produces seed pods that contain a fiber that was much used in Mayan clothing, and a flower that is often carved into stones in its temples. It is sometimes referred to as Arbor Mundi, tree of the world.

Over Easy: Outside the Borders

By: Thursday November 13, 2014 5:00 pm

An act so hideous that it is being rejected as beyond credulity by parents of murdered young men has become the force that unites the Mexican public against longterm corruption and criminal involvement by all levels of their governments and the police forces throughout the country. Gang members have confessed to murdering the students after they were handed to them by police acting on orders of the Mayor of Iguala, Mexico.

Sunday Food: Ruth Calvo’s Steamed Sausage Stuffed Peppers

By: Sunday November 9, 2014 9:35 am

Ruth Calvo’s Steamed Stuffed Peppers

Pull Up a Chair: Mayan Creation Story

By: Saturday November 8, 2014 4:00 am

Much of the story of creation of the Maya, the Popol Vuh, appears in carved representations throughout the temples that are being excavated many places in Mesoamerica.

The Popol Vuh relates the story which formed the basis of many of the Maya legend, and their celebrations. In the myths, after making the animals, the gods created a few versions of those they would give the job on this earth of properly serving them as gods.

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