Saturday Art: Influential Authors: John Jakes

brak the barbarian
Brak the Barbarian
It has been a while since I last read some of John Jakes’ works but there was a time in the ’70s and ’80s when I read just about everything as soon as it was published. I was still in college when I first started seeing a book titled The Bastard on the book racks around town. This book was shortly followed by The Rebels and The Seekers. I did not actually read them though until I was living in New Hampshire in late ’75 with my sister and her then husband. Over the next few years as I moved on into the USAF, I would pick up the new books of the Kent Family Chronicles as they were published. It was simply amazing how the members of the “Kent Family” always managed to be on the periphery of so many historical events and friends with so many historical figures. Why, you’d have thought they were named Forrest Gump or something!

Jakes’ wiki intro is only one sentence:

John William Jakes (born March 31, 1932)[1] is an American writer, best known for American historical fiction. He has used the pen name Jay Scotland.

One interesting fact I discovered about Jakes from his wiki is this:

During this time, he was a member of the Swordsmen and Sorcerers’ Guild of America (SAGA), a loose-knit group of heroic fantasy authors founded in the 1960s and led by Lin Carter. The eight original members were self-selected by fantasy credentials alone. They sought to promote the popularity and respectability of the “Sword and Sorcery” subgenre (such as Brak the Barbarian stories by Jakes).

I had not been aware of Jakes early membership in SAGA although once I started reading The Kent Family Chronicles and saw his list of books, I realized that I had read Brak the Barbarian and a couple of its sequels when I was in college.

Jakes has a second book series that is well known, North and South. From wiki on the trilogy: (more…)

Saturday Art: Influential Authors: John Jakes

brak the barbarian
Brak the Barbarian

Please Note: When I began this series, it was to cover a lot of authors whom I have found personally influential, even though this may only be because I enjoyed the stories they have told in their books or short stories. I’m just fortunate enough and well read enough that many of the authors I have personally enjoyed have also been influential on a macro scale as well as micro. rrt

It has been a while since I last read some of John Jakes’ works but there was a time in the ’70s and ’80s when I read just about everything as soon as it was published. I was still in college when I first started seeing a book titled The Bastard on the book racks around town. This book was shortly followed by The Rebels and The Seekers. I did not actually read them though until I was living in New Hampshire in late ’75 with my sister and her then husband. Over the next few years as I moved on into the USAF, I would pick up the new books of the Kent Family Chronicles as they were published. It was simply amazing how the members of the “Kent Family” always managed to be on the periphery of so many historical events and friends with so many historical figures. Why, you’d have thought they were named Forrest Gump or something!

Jakes’ wiki intro is only one sentence:

John William Jakes (born March 31, 1932)[1] is an American writer, best known for American historical fiction. He has used the pen name Jay Scotland.

One interesting fact I discovered about Jakes from his wiki is this:

During this time, he was a member of the Swordsmen and Sorcerers’ Guild of America (SAGA), a loose-knit group of heroic fantasy authors founded in the 1960s and led by Lin Carter. The eight original members were self-selected by fantasy credentials alone. They sought to promote the popularity and respectability of the “Sword and Sorcery” subgenre (such as Brak the Barbarian stories by Jakes).

I had not been aware of Jakes early membership in SAGA although once I started reading The Kent Family Chronicles and saw his list of books, I realized that I had read Brak the Barbarian and a couple of its sequels when I was in college.

Jakes has a second book series that is well known, North and South. From wiki on the trilogy:

North and South is a 1980s trilogy of bestselling novels by John Jakes which take place before, during, and after the American Civil War.[1] The saga tells the story of the enduring friendship between Orry Main of South Carolina and George Hazard of Pennsylvania, who become best friends while attending the United States Military Academy at West Point but later find themselves and their families on opposite sides of the war.[1] The slave-owning Mains are rural gentleman planters while the big-city Hazards live by manufacturing and industry, their differences reflecting the divisions between North and South that eventually led to the Civil War.

The North and South trilogy also became a trilogy of TV mini-series (North and South, North and South, Book II (the second book in the trilogy is titled Love and War), and Heaven and Hell) starring Patrick Swayze and James Read.

The Bastard, The Rebels and The Seekers were all made into TV movies in 1978 and 1979. I have no recollection of even hearing about these movies before but looking through the cast list, there are some quite interesting names.

Looking through the list of Jakes’ books there are some other titles beyond those I have mentioned that I have read and enjoyed – I, Barbarian about a romance in the time of Genghis Kahn, King’s Crusader set during the Crusades with Richard the Lionheart, When the Star Kings Die, and Veils of Salome.

JohnJakes.com gives Jakes’ full bio as well as some discussion on his various series and standard author web site fare.

Can you make a donation to help Firedoglake?
(more…)

Whistleblowers, Protests, Investigations, OH MY!

I am a US Air Force veteran. After I served in the Air Force, I worked for a couple of years for the Defense Logistics Agency then another ten plus years as a support contractor within the Department of Defense acquisitions universe. All through my years, the one group of people that I have most admired are those individuals who become known as Whistleblowers. One of the things that got me in occasional trouble with my employers and clients was stating that I admired folks like Ernest Fitzgerald.

Here at Firedoglake, I am proud to be able to support Chelsea Manning, John Kiriakou, and Thomas Drake. I always hoped that if the situation arose, that I would have the courage to blow the whistle on wrong doing. These individuals have shown their courage and willingness to stand up for what is right, no matter the odds. Manning and Kiriakou have sacrificed their freedom for their willingness to do what is right.

Firedoglake has reported (sometimes all alone) on Chelsea Manning’s trial, the Occupy Movement, the Proposition 8 trial. Firedoglake readers have provided support for Occupy and have helped send Kevin Gosztola to report on Occupy, Deepwater Horizon, and Ferguson, MO.

One of the many things I have loved about Firedoglake is the issues advocacy rather than supporting individual politicians. I love that FDL is independent enough to believe that if something is bad when done by the Republicans, it is equally bad when done by Democrats.

I also like that Firedoglake recognizes that we need to have fun as a companion to the serious topics. I like to write Saturday Art diaries, for the past year and a half concentrating on various authors I have read and enjoyed over the years. The weekend Book Salons have brought a wonderful mix of timely topics, accomplished authors and hosts.

Unfortunately there are costs to all of the things that Firedoglake accomplishes. I think the DDoS attacks from last year that Jane mentioned are about the best indicator there can be of the impact that FDL makes. If FDL were not making a significant impact, there would be no need for those attacks to happen.

Can you help Firedoglake stay online? If Firedoglake’s coverage of the issues, advocacy for Marijuana legalization and Prison Reform, and willingness to afflict the comfortable while trying to comfort the afflicted means anything to you, please help as much as you can.

Can you make a donation to help Firedoglake defray the costs of coverage and upgrades to the system? Twenty dollarsTen dollars?

Whistleblowers, Protests, Investigations, OH MY!

I am a US Air Force veteran. After I served in the Air Force, I worked for a couple of years for the Defense Logistics Agency then another ten plus years as a support contractor within the Department of Defense acquisitions universe. All through my years, the one group of people that I have most admired are those individuals who become known as Whistleblowers. One of the things that got me in occasional trouble with my employers and clients was stating that I admired folks like Ernest Fitzgerald.

Here at Firedoglake, I am proud to be able to support Chelsea Manning, John Kiriakou, and Thomas Drake. I always hoped that if the situation arose, that I would have the courage to blow the whistle on wrong doing. These individuals have shown their courage and willingness to stand up for what is right, no matter the odds. Manning and Kiriakou have sacrificed their freedom for their willingness to do what is right.

Firedoglake has reported (sometimes all alone) on Chelsea Manning’s trial, the Occupy Movement, the Proposition 8 trial. Firedoglake readers have provided support for Occupy and have helped send Kevin Gosztola to report on Occupy, Deepwater Horizon, and Ferguson, MO.

One of the many things I have loved about Firedoglake is the issues advocacy rather than supporting individual politicians. I love that FDL is independent enough to believe that if something is bad when done by the Republicans, it is equally bad when done by Democrats.

I also like that Firedoglake recognizes that we need to have fun as a companion to the serious topics. I like to write Saturday Art diaries, for the past year and a half concentrating on various authors I have read and enjoyed over the years. The weekend Book Salons have brought a wonderful mix of timely topics, accomplished authors and hosts.

Unfortunately there are costs to all of the things that Firedoglake accomplishes. I think the DDoS attacks from last year that Jane mentioned are about the best indicator there can be of the impact that FDL makes. If FDL were not making a significant impact, there would be no need for those attacks to happen.

Can you help Firedoglake stay online? If Firedoglake’s coverage of the issues, advocacy for Marijuana legalization and Prison Reform, and willingness to afflict the comfortable while trying to comfort the afflicted means anything to you, please help as much as you can.

Can you make a donation to help Firedoglake defray the costs of coverage and upgrades to the system? Twenty dollarsTen dollars?

Saturday Art: Influential Authors: Stephen R. Donaldson

Fangirl Moment!
Stephen R. Donaldson and fan

I first discovered Stephen R. Donaldson early in my days in Hawai’i. I first picked up his book The Illearth War one afternoon at the Base Exchange because of the interesting cover. It wasn’t until I got back to the barracks that I realized that it was the second of a fantasy series. After that, I went back to the Exchange and picked up the first, Lord Foul’s Bane and third, The Power That Preserves of the original Chronicles of Thomas Covenant. Here is the intro to Lord Foul’s Bane from Goodreads.com:

He called himself Thomas Covenant the Unbeliever because he dared not believe in the strange alternate world in which he suddenly found himself.

Yet the Land tempted him. He had been sick; now he seemed better than ever before. Through no fault of his own, he had been outcast, unclean, a pariah. Now he was regarded as a reincarnation of the Land’s greatest hero–Berek Halfhand–armed with the mystic power of White Gold. That power alone could protect the Lords of the Land from the ancient evil of Despiser, Lord Foul. Only…Covenant had no idea of how the power could be used!

Thus begins one of the most remarkable epic fantasies ever written…

Donaldson’s wiki had this to say about The Chronicles of Thomas Covenant:

Donaldson’s most celebrated series is The Chronicles of Thomas Covenant, which centers on a cynical leper, shunned by society, who is destined to become the heroic savior of an alternative Earth. Covenant struggles against the tyrannical Lord Foul, who intends to break the physical universe in order to escape his bondage and wreak revenge upon his arch enemy, The Creator.

The Chronicles were originally published as two trilogies of novels between 1977 and 1983. According to his current publisher, Putnam’s, those two series sold more than 10 million copies. A third series, The Last Chronicles of Thomas Covenant, began publication in 2004 with the novel The Runes of the Earth. With the second book of that series, Fatal Revenant, Donaldson again attained bestseller status when the book reached number 12 on the New York Times Bestseller List in October 2007.

One of my best friends while in Hawai’i had also read the first trilogy so we had a lot of good discussions on it that continued when the second trilogy came along. The Wounded Land actually came out not long after we’d finished the first trilogy although we had to wait a couple of years before The One Tree came out. We were both out of the service and I was back on the mainland when The White Gold Wielder was published. I have not read any of the books from The Last Chronicles of Thomas Covenant (four books published from 2004 to 2013) but they are all on my to read list although I may have to get the first two trilogies out of storage and at least skim them again and refresh the memory.

Donaldson has a couple of other Sci-fi/Fantasy series. The Gap series is five books which I have not read and Mordant’s Need is comprised of two books which I have read. From Goodreads: (more…)

Saturday Art: Influential Authors: Stephen R. Donaldson

Fangirl Moment!
Stephen R. Donaldson and fan

Please Note: When I began this series, it was to cover a lot of authors whom I have found personally influential, even though this may only be because I enjoyed the stories they have told in their books or short stories. I’m just fortunate enough and well read enough that many of the authors I have personally enjoyed have also been influential on a macro scale as well as micro. rrt

I first discovered Stephen R. Donaldson early in my days in Hawai’i. I first picked up his book The Illearth War one afternoon at the Base Exchange because of the interesting cover. It wasn’t until I got back to the barracks that I realized that it was the second of a fantasy series. After that, I went back to the Exchange and picked up the first, Lord Foul’s Bane and third, The Power That Preserves of the original Chronicles of Thomas Covenant. Here is the intro to Lord Foul’s Bane from Goodreads.com:

He called himself Thomas Covenant the Unbeliever because he dared not believe in the strange alternate world in which he suddenly found himself.

Yet the Land tempted him. He had been sick; now he seemed better than ever before. Through no fault of his own, he had been outcast, unclean, a pariah. Now he was regarded as a reincarnation of the Land’s greatest hero–Berek Halfhand–armed with the mystic power of White Gold. That power alone could protect the Lords of the Land from the ancient evil of Despiser, Lord Foul. Only…Covenant had no idea of how the power could be used!

Thus begins one of the most remarkable epic fantasies ever written…

Donaldson’s wiki had this to say about The Chronicles of Thomas Covenant:

Donaldson’s most celebrated series is The Chronicles of Thomas Covenant, which centers on a cynical leper, shunned by society, who is destined to become the heroic savior of an alternative Earth. Covenant struggles against the tyrannical Lord Foul, who intends to break the physical universe in order to escape his bondage and wreak revenge upon his arch enemy, The Creator.

The Chronicles were originally published as two trilogies of novels between 1977 and 1983. According to his current publisher, Putnam’s, those two series sold more than 10 million copies. A third series, The Last Chronicles of Thomas Covenant, began publication in 2004 with the novel The Runes of the Earth. With the second book of that series, Fatal Revenant, Donaldson again attained bestseller status when the book reached number 12 on the New York Times Bestseller List in October 2007.

One of my best friends while in Hawai’i had also read the first trilogy so we had a lot of good discussions on it that continued when the second trilogy came along. The Wounded Land actually came out not long after we’d finished the first trilogy although we had to wait a couple of years before The One Tree came out. We were both out of the service and I was back on the mainland when The White Gold Wielder was published. I have not read any of the books from The Last Chronicles of Thomas Covenant (four books published from 2004 to 2013) but they are all on my to read list although I may have to get the first two trilogies out of storage and at least skim them again and refresh the memory.

Donaldson has a couple of other Sci-fi/Fantasy series. The Gap series is five books which I have not read and Mordant’s Need is comprised of two books which I have read. From Goodreads: (more…)

Pull Up a Chair: The Jackal’s Frederick Forsyth

The Day Of The Jackal. Frederick Forsyth. #vscocam #vsco #InstaSize #blackandwhite #books #reading
The Day Of The Jackal. Frederick Forsyth.
Frederick Forsyth’s first novel, The Day of the Jackal was a New York Times best seller sensation and Edgar Award winner. I read it shortly after publication along with his next two novels. I’m not sure why I got away from reading his works, but it may have been as simple as just too many good books from too many other good authors. Plus it is difficult, if not impossible, to reach the top levels of success after achieving it at the start.

Forsyth’s wiki intro gives the basics:

Frederick Forsyth, CBE (born 25 August 1938) is an English author and occasional political commentator. He is best known for thrillers such as The Day of the Jackal, The Odessa File, The Fourth Protocol, The Dogs of War, The Devil’s Alternative, The Fist of God, Icon, The Veteran, Avenger, The Afghan,The Cobra and The Kill List.

I did not know anything of Forsyth’s background when I started this diary but I have to say I am impressed. From his bio on his web site:

In 1965 he joined the BBC and was sent to Biafra to cover the war that was raging in Nigeria. What he saw of this brutal and cynical conflict made it difficult for him to toe the editorial line of the BBC’s coverage so he resigned, turned freelance, vanished into the thick of the conflict and later emerged to publish the highly controversial The Biafra Story. In 1969 he decided to use his experience as a Reuters reporter in France as the basis for a thriller. Within 35 day he’d completed The Day of the Jackal, which established him as one of the world’s leading thriller writers. To date it has sold in the region of 10 million copies and was made into a major film starring Edward Fox in 1973.

Wiki quotes him from a BBC documentary:

I was told quite bluntly, then, ‘it is not our policy to cover this war.’ This was a period when the Vietnam War was front-page headlines almost every day, regarded broadly as an American cock-up, and this particularly British cock-up in Nigeria was not going to be covered. I smelt news management. I don’t like news management. So I made a private vow to myself: ‘you may, gentlemen, not be covering it, but I’m going to cover it.’ So I quit and flew out there, and stayed there for most of the next two years.

As I mentioned earlier, I also read The Odessa File and The Dogs of War not long after publication (though if I remember correctly, it was first run paperback reads).

Forsyth’s IMDB page shows eighteen writing credits. The Day of the Jackal with Edward Fox, The Odessa File with Jon Voight and Maximillan Schell, The Dogs of War with Christopher Walken and Tom Berenger, and The Fourth Protocol with Michael Caine and Pierce Brosnan all fit the definitions of “a major motion picture.”

Wiki also has some discussion on Forsyth’s writing style:

Forsyth eschews psychological complexity in favour of meticulous plotting, based on detailed factual research. His books are full of information about the technical details of such subjects as money laundering, gun running and identity theft. His novels read like investigative journalism in fictional guise. His moral vision is a harsh one: the world is made up of predators and prey, and only the strong survive.

Forsyth’s novels typically show the ways in which spies, gangsters, assassins, mercenaries, diplomats, business leaders and politicians go about their business behind the scenes; the sort of things that the average reader would not suspect while reading a simple headline. The Jackal does not just go out and shoot at Charles de Gaulle: he does meticulous research on the man at the library of the British Museum; obtains papers for his false identities; travels around Paris to find a good location for a sniper’s nest; and buys and tests his weapons.

I wonder if Forsyth received any visits from the British equivalent of Homeland Security for his descriptions of how “…spies, gangsters, assassins, mercenaries, diplomats, business leaders and politicians go about their business behind the scenes…”?

(more…)

PUAC: Saturday Art, Influential Authors: Frederick Forsyth

The Day Of The Jackal. Frederick Forsyth. #vscocam #vsco #InstaSize #blackandwhite #books #reading
The Day Of The Jackal. Frederick Forsyth.

Please Note: When I began this series, it was to cover a lot of authors whom I have found personally influential, even though this may only be because I enjoyed the stories they have told in their books or short stories. I’m just fortunate enough and well read enough that many of the authors I have personally enjoyed have also been influential on a macro scale as well as micro. rrt

Frederick Forsyth’s first novel, The Day of the Jackal was a New York Times best seller sensation and Edgar Award winner. I read it shortly after publication along with his next two novels. I’m not sure why I got away from reading his works, but it may have been as simple as just too many good books from too many other good authors. Plus it is difficult, if not impossible, to reach the top levels of success after achieving it at the start.

Forsyth’s wiki intro gives the basics:

Frederick Forsyth, CBE (born 25 August 1938) is an English author and occasional political commentator. He is best known for thrillers such as The Day of the Jackal, The Odessa File, The Fourth Protocol, The Dogs of War, The Devil’s Alternative, The Fist of God, Icon, The Veteran, Avenger, The Afghan,The Cobra and The Kill List.

I did not know anything of Forsyth’s background when I started this diary but I have to say I am impressed. From his bio on his web site:

In 1965 he joined the BBC and was sent to Biafra to cover the war that was raging in Nigeria. What he saw of this brutal and cynical conflict made it difficult for him to toe the editorial line of the BBC’s coverage so he resigned, turned freelance, vanished into the thick of the conflict and later emerged to publish the highly controversial The Biafra Story. In 1969 he decided to use his experience as a Reuters reporter in France as the basis for a thriller. Within 35 day he’d completed The Day of the Jackal, which established him as one of the world’s leading thriller writers. To date it has sold in the region of 10 million copies and was made into a major film starring Edward Fox in 1973.

Wiki quotes him from a BBC documentary:

I was told quite bluntly, then, ‘it is not our policy to cover this war.’ This was a period when the Vietnam War was front-page headlines almost every day, regarded broadly as an American cock-up, and this particularly British cock-up in Nigeria was not going to be covered. I smelt news management. I don’t like news management. So I made a private vow to myself: ‘you may, gentlemen, not be covering it, but I’m going to cover it.’ So I quit and flew out there, and stayed there for most of the next two years.

As I mentioned earlier, I also read The Odessa File and The Dogs of War not long after publication (though if I remember correctly, it was first run paperback reads).

Forsyth’s IMDB page shows eighteen writing credits. The Day of the Jackal with Edward Fox, The Odessa File with Jon Voight and Maximillan Schell, The Dogs of War with Christopher Walken and Tom Berenger, and The Fourth Protocol with Michael Caine and Pierce Brosnan all fit the definitions of “a major motion picture.”

Wiki also has some discussion on Forsyth’s writing style:

Forsyth eschews psychological complexity in favour of meticulous plotting, based on detailed factual research. His books are full of information about the technical details of such subjects as money laundering, gun running and identity theft. His novels read like investigative journalism in fictional guise. His moral vision is a harsh one: the world is made up of predators and prey, and only the strong survive.

Forsyth’s novels typically show the ways in which spies, gangsters, assassins, mercenaries, diplomats, business leaders and politicians go about their business behind the scenes; the sort of things that the average reader would not suspect while reading a simple headline. The Jackal does not just go out and shoot at Charles de Gaulle: he does meticulous research on the man at the library of the British Museum; obtains papers for his false identities; travels around Paris to find a good location for a sniper’s nest; and buys and tests his weapons.

I wonder if Forsyth received any visits from the British equivalent of Homeland Security for his descriptions of how “…spies, gangsters, assassins, mercenaries, diplomats, business leaders and politicians go about their business behind the scenes…”?

(more…)

Saturday Art: Influential Authors: George Plimpton

George Plimpton: Paper Lion
George Plimpton: Paper Lion

George Plimpton just might have been the ultimate modern day, real life Walter Mitty, an everyman fulfilling various fantasies on the sports field and elsewhere then living to tell the tale, no matter how bumbling his exploits may have been. From his wiki intro:

George Ames Plimpton (March 18, 1927 – September 25, 2003) was an American journalist, writer, literary editor, actor, and occasional amateur sportsman. He is widely known for his sports writing and for helping to found The Paris Review. Plimpton was also famous for “participatory journalism” which included competing in professional sporting events, acting in a Western, performing a comedy act at Caesars Palace in Las Vegas, and playing with the New York Philharmonic Orchestra[1] and then recording the experience from the point of view of an amateur.

While the above is rather dry, a few paragraphs from his obituary from the New York Times may provide a better snap shot of Plimpton’s exploits:

All of this contributed to the charm of reading about Mr. Plimpton’s frequently hapless adventures; as “professional” athlete, stand-up comedian, movie bad guy or circus performer; which he chronicled in witty, elegant prose in nearly three dozen books.

As a boxer, he had his nose bloodied by Archie Moore at Stillman’s Gym in 1959. As a pitcher he became utterly exhausted and couldn’t finish an exhibition against 16 stars from the National and American Leagues (though he managed to get Willie Mays to pop up). And as a “professional” third-string quarterback, he lost roughly 30 yards during a scrimmage with the Detroit Lions in 1963.

He also tried his hand at tennis (Pancho Gonzalez beat him easily), bridge (Oswald Jacoby outmaneuvered him) and golf. With his handicap of 18, he lost badly to Arnold Palmer and Jack Nicklaus.

In a brief stint as a goaltender for the Boston Bruins, he made the mistake of catching a puck in his gloved hand, and it caused a nasty gash in his pinkie. He failed as an aerialist when he tried out for the Clyde Beatty-Cole Brothers Circus. As a symphonist, he wangled a temporary percussionist’s job with the New York Philharmonic. He was assigned to play sleigh bells, triangle, bass drum and gong, the latter of which he struck so hard during a Tchaikovsky chestnut that Leonard Bernstein, who was trying to conduct the piece, burst into applause.

My personal introduction to Plimpton was the book Paper Lion: Confessions of a Last String Quarterback which I read not long after it was first published in 1963:

October Is Domestic Violence Awareness Month

No excuse for domestic violence
There is no excuse for domestic violence

Although October is Domestic Violence Awareness Month, we have actually (I hope) gotten quite a bit more aware of domestic violence these past few months. We never know what action or incident is going to be a tipping point for an issue and cause it to dominate the news cycle. For domestic violence, apparently seeing Ray Rice carry his unconscious fiancée from an elevator in Atlantic City, then seeing the NFL’s original, minimal punishment before the video from the elevator itself showing Rice knocking her out was leaked, became the catalyst for this issue.

I have written about this issue in previous years (2009, 2012 on Domestic Violence alone and in 2010 and 2013 I combined Domestic Violence with Breast Cancer Awareness.) As I have stated previously, I do not know why this issue is one I feel so strongly about but it is.

The web site DomesticViolenceStatistics.org offers some very sobering statistics:

Every 9 seconds in the US a woman is assaulted or beaten.

Around the world, at least one in every three women has been beaten, coerced into sex or otherwise abused during her lifetime. Most often, the abuser is a member of her own family.

Domestic violence is the leading cause of injury to women—more than car accidents, muggings, and rapes combined.

Studies suggest that up to 10 million children witness some form of domestic violence annually.

Nearly 1 in 5 teenage girls who have been in a relationship said a boyfriend threatened violence or self-harm if presented with a breakup.

These are just a few of the Domestic Violence statistics and SafeHorizons.org has some more sobering facts.

Most of the time when people talk about Domestic Violence, it is meant as adult on adult violence but the reality is, child abuse is also a form of domestic violence. Wiki offers definitions for Intimate Partner Violence, Domestic Violence, and Family Abuse (including child and elder abuse.)

The National Coalition Against Domestic Violence offers some history: