(photo: Dana Gonzales)

In 1944, in South Carolina, a fourteen year old black child had his life ended in this manner.

The youngest person to be executed in the US since the 19th century, the black teenager was a little over five feet tall, weighed 95lbs, and had to put a bible on the seat beneath him so that he could fit into the electric chair. His feet dangled some way above the floor.

He was executed 84 days after his trial ended. A trial which convicted him after lasting all of three hours and after an all-white jury determined after ten minutes he had bludgeoned two young white girls to death.

After all these years the young man’s case, the case of George Stinney may be reopened, the scab removed after a seventy-year old lingering wound.

And now we come to a family member of the victims, who opposes reopening the case, but sums up attitudes towards past injustice in this country vividly.

Frankie Bailey Dyches said she believed Stinney had “got what he deserved” and that “justice was served, according to the laws in 1944”.

And that, apparently, is justice enough.

Meanwhile, things stay pretty awesome for wealthier white guys.