Good Evening, Ladies and Bruces!

You all have probably heard of the young lady named Sophie Lester from Brisbane, Australia. Miss Lester, having seen the film How to Train Your Dragon, was keen on having a dragon of her very own. On the advice of her parents, she wrote to the scientists at Australia’s national science agency, CSIRO, asking them if they could possibly make a dragon for her:

Hello Lovely Scientist

My name is Sophie and I am 7 years old. My dad told me about the scientists at the CSIRO. Would it be possible if you can make a dragon for me. I would like it if you could but if you can’t thats fine.

I would call it toothless if it was a girl and if it is a boy I would name it Stuart.

I would keep it in my special green grass area where there are lots of space. I would feed it raw fish and I would put a collar on it. If it got hurt I would bandage it if it hurt himself. I would play with it every weekend when there is no school.

Love from Sophie

The boffins at CSIRO, realizing that they had been remiss in their dragon R&D duties, swung into action:

Toothless, 3D printed out of titanium, came into the world at Lab 22, our additive manufacturing facility in Melbourne. The scientists there have printed some extraordinary things in the past—huge anatomically correct insects, biomedical implants and aerospace parts. So they thought a dragon was achievable.

“Being that electron beams were used to 3D print her, we are certainly glad she didn’t come out breathing them … instead of fire,” said Chad Henry, our Additive Manufacturing Operations Manager. “Titanium is super strong and lightweight, so Toothless will be a very capable flyer.”

You can view the birth of Toothless the Titanium Dragon at the video above.