The coffee’s freshly ground, there’s a wide variety of teas and the sticky buns are homemade.

  • “Shares, the euro and oil all rose sharply on the world’s financial markets on Thursday amid signs that Greece had won sufficient support from its private-sector creditors to clinch a new bailout package. Greek officials reported high levels of take-up by private creditors for the deal. After markets had closed last night one senior government official told Reuters the take-up had been close to 95% an hour before the deadline, more than enough to banish fears that renewed crisis in Greece would hit economic growth and financial markets around the world.”
  • “Japan has reported a record current account deficit in January, due mainly to rising energy imports after last year’s earthquake and tsunami led to most of the country’s nuclear plants being shut down. The shortfall – the sum of international trade and overseas investment flows – was 437.4 billion yen ($5.4 billion), the biggest monthly deficit since comparable data began to be recorded in 1985, the Financial Times reported. “
  • “Billionaires might be able to buy more pretty baubles, but they still only get one vote. That appears to be what Australia’s deputy prime minister was counting on when he attacked some of the country’s richest citizens. The sustained assault by Wayne Swan — aimed largely at outspoken mining billionaires — began a week ago, with an essay in which he warned that “the rising power of vested interests” endangered Australia’s success.”
  • “Colombian President Juan Manuel Santos says Cuba will not be invited to the Americas Summit in Colombia next month. Some nations had been threatening to boycott the meeting in Cartagena unless Cuba was admitted. But speaking after talks with Cuban President Raul Castro in Havana, Mr Santos said that – without a consensus – he could not make the invitation.”
  • Amy Goodman: “Super Tuesday demonstrated the rancor rife in Republican ranks, as the four remaining major candidates slug it out to see how far to the right of President Barack Obama they can go. While attacking him daily for the high cost of gasoline, both sides are traveling down the same perilous road in their support of nuclear power.”
  • KONY 2012: “Critics of the organization have argued that Invisible Children doesn’t spend enough of the money it raises on direct services. Invisible Children, in its statement, clarifies that the groups has a three-pronged mission:”
  • “The United Nations humanitarian chief, Lady Amos, said she was shocked by the devastation she witnessed on a visit to Baba Amr, the suburb of the Syrian city of Homs that has suffered a month-long siege. Amos, who visited Baba Amr on Wednesday for 45 minutes, was speaking on Thursday after meeting ministers in the regime of President Bashar al-Assad, who permitted her to visit Syria and Homs after weeks of refusing her access.”
  • “A special team at the media regulator Ofcom is examining whether James Murdoch is fit to remain chairman of BSkyB and if News Corp should be stripped of its stake in the broadcaster because of the phone-hacking scandal, it emerged last night. Freedom of Information disclosures show that Ofcom has created a unit called Project Apple to assess the fitness of Rupert Murdoch’s global news empire to hold a controlling 39 per cent stake in Britain’s biggest broadcaster. It is a considerable escalation in Ofcom’s response to the disclosures that News Corp’s British newspaper subsidiary, News International, has engaged in widespread criminality.”
  • “Binyamin Netanyahu, the Israeli prime minister, has said that an attack on Iran’s nuclear facilities is not inevitable. But he claimed it is the threat of military action, not sanctions, that will deter Tehran from developing an atomic bomb. Following his White House meeting with Barack Obama this week, Netanyahu differed with the president over the value of diplomacy and was sceptical about a fresh round of talks between Tehran and the major powers, telling Fox News that Iran has ‘bamboozled the west’.”
  • “Long before Tahrir Square captured the imagination of the world as the stage for Egypt’s revolution, it was an infamous, clandestine meeting place for gay Cairenes. Gay men could be seen in Tahrir cruising with knowing glances as they leaned against the guardrails, Cairo’s traffic swirling around them. They were hidden in plain sight. In many ways, the huge demonstrations of early 2011 that took place in Tahrir Square and led to the toppling of President Hosni Mubarak inspired Egypt’s gay community to join the call for a new, more democratic nation. But now more than a year into the revolution, Egypt’s lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) community has stepped back out of the public eye and retreated into the shadows once again.”  So very sad.
  • “Our job as journalists carries with it an inherent risk that affects us all, irrespective of our gender or ethnic background, because we go to places and events that people are trying to get away from: disaster zones, violent confrontations, and unrest. However, the way that that risk plays itself out can be gender-specific.”

TRNN:

  • A Glimpse into Rural Egypt. Support for Muslim Brotherhood and Military Council widespread despite growing economic insecurity plaguing the country.”

I only wish I’d had the women’s stories for yesterday’s Diner.

A great parody. Women’s Suffrage. The first one who can name the original artist wins, hmmmm, lemme think about that, there may be some who wouldn’t admit it publicly.

The truth will set you free but first it will piss you off.

Update: John Trudell, former AIM leader, will be giving a lecture at Gustavus Adolphus College in Saint Peter, MN this Saturday, 10 Mar, that’s tomorrow, at 1:15 EST. The workshop will be live streamed here. His lecture is titled Unresolved Conflict: Remember Our Forgotten History.