The coffee’s freshly ground, there’s a wide variety of teas and the sticky buns are homemade.

  • “The Greek prime minister, Lucas Papademos, is to hold last-minute talks with eurozone finance ministers on Monday to ensure his near-bankrupt country finally secures a vital €130bn bailout and avoids a default on its debts that could put the single currency at risk.”
  • “Hundreds of thousands of protesters demonstrated in Spain on Sunday against austerity measures and changes to labor laws that would make it easier for companies to fire employees, reported the Associated Press.”
  • “Most scientists, on achieving high office, keep their public remarks to the bland and reassuring. Last week Nina Fedoroff, the president of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS), broke ranks in a spectacular manner.
    She confessed that she was now ‘scared to death’ by the anti-science movement that was spreading, uncontrolled, across the US and the rest of the western world.”
  • “The Heartland Institute, the libertarian thinktank whose project to undermine science lessons for schoolchildren was exposed this week, faces new scrutiny of its finances – including its donors and tax status. The Guardian has learned of a whistleblower complaint to the Internal Revenue Service about Heartland’s 501(c)(3) tax-exempt status.”
  • “The judicial committtee supervising Egypt’s first voting since its revolution has set a date for nominations to begin for the presidential election but failed to follow through on a promise to announce when the election will actually happen. The committee had been expected to announce a date on Sunday, but judges told a news conference the decision was being delayed as they worked out how to ensure Egyptians abroad will have enough time to vote.”
  • “A Palestinian prisoner being held in Israel without charges or trial has begun his 10th week of a hunger strike. Khader Adnan has not eaten since mid-December when he was arrested by Israeli forces at his West Bank home. Doctors say that after 64 days without food the prisoner is at immediate risk of death.”
  • “America’s top general yesterday gave his clearest public warning yet against a ‘destabilising’ Israeli strike on Iran as a senior US security official arrived in Jerusalem amid expectations that he would urge Benjamin Netanyahu to give sanctions time to bite.”
  • “The attack at night was sudden and fierce, mortar rounds followed by machine-gun fire. There was panic among some of the inexperienced Syrian rebel fighters. But Sadoun al-Husseini had seen it all before. Mr Husseini got his combat experience in Iraq, fighting first against American forces and then as a member of the ‘Anbar Awakening’, when Sunni nationalists turned their guns against foreign fighters affiliated with al-Qa’ida.”
  • “Burmese monk Shin Gambira, one of the leaders of anti-government protests in 2007, will face fresh legal action, according to state media. He is accused of staying in a monastery that had been sealed by the authorities and of breaking into two others.”
  • “Like most Burmese journalists, Ye Naing Moe had never trusted the bureaucrats at the Ministry of Information — and with good reason. His father, a political activist, had been arrested four times, and he himself had been spied on by government agents. His journalism students were followed and interrogated about his lectures. ‘In the past, well, I wasn’t loved by the authorities,’ he said with a wry grin.”
  • “Researchers in Australia and America announced that they built a working transistor from a single phosphorus atom embedded in a silicon crystal, according to The New York Times. Their findings were published in the journal Nature Nanotechnology on Sunday.”

TRRN:

From WBAI New York: Prof Richard Wolff’s weekly radio broadcast, Economic Update. His guest is Prof Wm Stickland of UMass. They discus capitalism and the African-American community. Scroll down to Saturday, 18 Feb, 12:00pm.

From Sundance via PBS: Slavery By Another Name.

The truth will set you free but first it will piss you off.