It amazes me that bland candidate-robot Mitt Romney stirs such antagonism — nay, passion — from his fellow GOPs, especially among the conservatives who formed the bedrock of his 2008 campaign to leapfrog Grampa Walnuts for his party’s nomination. Mitt appears to have spurned his formerly supportive wealthy right-winger in his party; they now seem very afraid their party is about to nominate a business-school clone of Barack Obama: a Massachusetts moderate, as Newtie calls him.

Health care mandates, man-on-man dates, free government-funded abortion on demand: Mitt’s played the field on these issues and been called out on his flip-flops by his rivals for the nomination. Until last night, when the expected walloping of Mitt simply didn’t happen. His own nastiness was on full display, of course, when he decided to pick on the little fellahs: George Stephanopolous over his relentless condom questioning and Jon Huntsman because he speaks Chinese.

Now, though, we may understand why everybody laid back: they all had been offered “When Mitt Romney Came to Town” a thirty-minute expose of what, exactly, Mitt Romney’s Bain Capital did to the people, the communities, and jobs when they took over companies to ‘fix,’ milking those enterprises dry with consulting fees and exorbitant debt and stripped assets.

“A story of greed,” the narrator intones. “Playing the system for a quick buck. A group of corporate raiders, led by Mitt Romney. More ruthless than Wall Street. For tens of thousands of Americans, the suffering began when Mitt Romney came to town.”

While Jon Huntsman’s dad-funded SuperPAC thought they had the rights to the thing last Friday, Newtie’s casino-magnate-funded SuperPAC won the round. Whether they unleash it in New Hampshire, or wait until South Carolina, it’s devastating. I’ve only seen the trailer so far, and now you can too:

Mitt Romney was no businessman — he was, and remains, a corporate privateer, a pirate whose company’s business model was exploitation, asset-strips, debt-compounding, fee-generation, and jobs-exporting. But I thought all along that these were attributes admired by the GOP.

Apparently not by all of them.