If you needed any additional evidence that the Republican Party is a quasi-religious organization that no longer relies on empirical evidence in forming its policy positions, here’s Paul Ryan (R-WI) explaining why he wants to destroy Medicare to keep taxes low for millionaires.

ROBERT SIEGEL, host:

As you look forward, if you’re going to reach an agreement with the Democrats that raises debt ceilings, avoids calamity, is there ultimately some room that you can imagine, for – from your standpoint – at least some nominal tax increase that gives the possibility for both sides to walk into a room and come out of a room and say, we got some of what we wanted here? Or is that absolutely…

Rep. RYAN: I don’t yeah, I don’t see it. And let me explain why, and this isn’t a political thing. It’s an economic belief. It’s an economic doctrine thing.

Just so we’re clear about what that means — three definitions of “belief”:

1.

something believed;  an opinion or conviction: a belief that the earth is flat.

2.

confidence in the truth or existence of something not immediately susceptible to rigorous proof: a statement unworthy of belief.
3.
confidence; faith; trust: a child’s belief in his parents.

And just like believing the Earth is flat or a child-like faith in Santa Claus, Ryan is admitting that — despite the fact that the Bush tax cuts have not produced jobs or shared prosperity, despite the fact that taxes are historically low and the deficit is historically high, despite the fact that there is no rigorous proof that low taxes do anything but make rich people richer — he refuses to raise them one iota because of his personal belief in the doctrine of St. Grover.

There’s nothing “serious” or “adult” about that. The man is a dangerous fanatic.