Good morning, firepuppers! And how are you all this lovely Saturday morning?

Earlier this week, I wrote a Seminal piece on how Minnesota Republicans Tim Pawlenty and Tom Emmer — our soon-to-be gone absentee governor and the man who would like to follow his political footsteps — are courting the Neo-Confederate wing of the GOP. When discussing Emmer, the piece cited this blog post by MN Observer from The Cucking Stool, whose writers have been doing singularly good work in documenting how Tom Emmer’s been sending out all sorts of coded signals to the folks who wished that the South had won and slavery was still legal. These posts have struck a nerve — and comedy gold — by engendering a hilariously disjointed set of desperately handwaving Tweets from local Republican functionary David “Thurmond” Strom, who apparently really, really, really wants The Cucking Stool to stop pointing out this new wrinkle in the GOP’s Southern Strategy.

Heh. Fat chance of that, buddy.

Not only did it not stop the series of blog posts documenting the Tentherism and secessionism exhibited by He Who Hates Waiters, but Spotty, the head writer of The Cucking Stool, used the occasion to announce an imminent video he’s putting together on Tom Emmer and the subject of nullification. He also went on to show how Emmer showed Ben-Domenech-like industriousness in copying the secession resolutions of South Carolina and Mississippi (not to mention other Confederate-era documents) in his rather bizarre nullification speeches.

Here’s Tom Emmer attempting to make an argument that he — as a prominent “Minnesota Super Lawyer” — should know full well was utterly demolished nearly two hundred years ago by the United States Supreme Court in McCulloch v. Maryland:

Citizens of Minnesota are sovereign individuals, subject to Minnesota law and immune from any federal laws that exceed the federal government’s enumerated constitutional powers. A federal law does not apply in Minnesota unless that law is approved by a two-thirds vote of the members of each house of the legislature and is signed by the governor. [ ]

Here’s the secession resolution for the state of Mississippi:

Whereas, the constitutional Union was formed by the several states in their separate soverign [sic] capacity for the purpose of mutual advantage and protection;

That the several states are distinct sovereignities [sic again; oh well, at least Emmer corrected the spelling], whose supremacy is limited so far only as the same has been delegated by voluntary compact to a federal government, and, when it fails to accomplish the ends for which it was established, the parties to the compact have the right to resume, each state for itself, such delegated powers;

That the institution of slavery existed prior to the formation of the federal Constitution, and is recognized by its letter, and all efforts to impair its value or lessen its duration by Congress, or any of the free states, is a violation of the compact of Union and is destructive of the ends for which it was ordained, but in defiance of the principles of the Union thus established, the people of the Northern states have assumed a revolutionary position toward the Southern states;

That they have set at defiance that portion of the Constitution which was intended to secure domestic tranquility among the states and promote their general welfare, namely: “No person held to service or labor in one state, under the laws thereof, escaping into another shall, in consequence of any law or regulation therein, be discharged from such service or labor, but shall be delivered up, on claim of the party to whom the service or labor may be due;”

Tweet that, Strommie.

Of course, most Minnesotans not in white-flight exurbs or gated communities really aren’t too keen on this sort of thing. For those who would rather have someone who isn’t a race-baiter and a frequent liar as their next governor, there is a very good alternative, and his name’s Mark Dayton.