At Chez Siberia, it’s sort of difficult to put a line in the sand and say, “I know it’s spring now.” In Upstate New York, ‘Spring’ is sort of an amorphous concept: I remember in May, 1973, we had 6″ of very wet snow, which took down a lot of trees and bushes because they’d already leafed out. I also remember growing up and seeing all the kids go to church on Easter Sunday wearing their finery – and no matter how late the Easter was, they were also wearing their snow boots and winter coats (another sign of global climate change – kids get to wear their Easter outfits now with no coats up here unless it’s raining).

However, last night, I got the message, big time. The DH and I went to visit some farmers from whom we buy meat (we usually see them at the farmer’s market but the last time we spoke with them, they mentioned that they have an appointment with the USDA processing plant and wanted to know if we wanted anything special. It’s another sign of the explosion in popularity of eating local and farmers markets that they have to make an appointment months in advance because there are not enough USDA inspectors and not enough USDA meat processing plants. When they first got started, they could call and get work done on a few days notice. No longer). This is a lovely couple who live on the top of a hill over the mountain from us and when we arrived last evening and stepped out of the car in the twilight, I turned to the DH and pronounced spring HAD arrived.

The ‘spring peepers’ were singing their hearts out. Oh, my they were just chorusing all over the place. Yes, there were lambs and piglets and new chicks all over the place, all usual signs of the beginning of things. But spring peepers are my measure. We never hear them if it is not warm enough – at this point, I have put my stick in the ground and said, “Yep, it’s spring.”

What is the sign for you that spring has definitely arrived (and Joe Bastardi from Accuweather™ ) doesn’t count)?  Pull up a chair…

apple blossom photo by the author