Alaskans are unhappy with Sarah Palin about the Bridge to Nowhere.

During her first speech after being named as McCain’s surprise pick as running mate, Palin said she had told Congress "’thanks but no thanks’ on that bridge to nowhere."

In the city of Ketchikan, the planned site of the so-called "Bridge to Nowhere," political leaders of both parties said the claim was false and a betrayal of their community, because she had supported the bridge and the earmark for it secured by Alaska’s Congressional delegation during her run for governor.

Oops, does that mean she has give up her seat on the Straight Talk Express? Because only politicians who always tell the truth get to ride there.

When she was running for governor in 2006, Palin said she was insulted by the term "bridge to nowhere," according to Ketchikan Mayor Bob Weinstein, a Democrat, and Mike Elerding, a Republican who was Palin’s campaign coordinator in the southeast Alaska city.

"People are learning that she pandered to us by saying, I’m for this’ … and then when she found it was politically advantageous for her nationally, abruptly she starts using the very term that she said was insulting," Weinstein said.

So which is it, Governor Palin? Thanks, or no thanks?

In fact, the Palin administration has spent "tens of millions of dollars" in federal funds to start building a road on Gravina Island that is supposed to link up to the yet-to-be-built bridge, Weinstein said.

"She said ‘thanks but no thanks,’ but they kept the money," said Elerding about her applause line.

Hope she can take time from her Hype-the-Hurricane Tour to tell Americans — especially Alaskans — what she said and what she meant. Maybe McCain can give her a little lesson in Straight Talk. He’s so good at it.