Clark Hoyt, Public Editor of the New York Times, responded to the William Kristol kerfuffle in yesterday’s Times:

Of the nearly 700 messages I have received since Kristol’s selection was announced — more than half of them before he ever wrote a word for The Times — exactly one praised the choice….

This is a decision I would not have made. But it is not the end of the world. Everyone should take a deep breath and calm down. Safire was greeted with jeers and got off to a rocky start, calling Watergate “a tempest in a Teapot Dome” before eventually acknowledging that he had been “grandly, gloriously, egregiously wrong.” He went on to a distinguished, 32-year career at The Times and, agree or disagree with him, he was a compelling presence on the Op-Ed page.

INTERNAL MEMORANDUM

From: Human Resources

Re: Opening in Editorial Department: Public Editor/Ombudsman

The Editorial Board is commencing a search for a new Public Editor/Ombudsman. This position requires a minimum of ten hours per week in which the Public Editor reviews and addresses concerns and fields complaints from the paper’s readership regarding any particular story or any alleged breach of the newspaper’s journalistic standards.

The ideal candidate must possess the following qualifications:

  • Minimum of 3 months of editorial experience
  • Working knowledge of Louise Hay self-help catalogue
  • Appreciation for cognitive dissonance
  • Ability to write in avuncular, yet condescending, tone
  • Healthy capacity for wishful thinking
  • Has immediate access to deep wells of justification and rationalization
  • Is intimately familiar with the lyrics to "Tomorrow" from the musical, "Annie"
  • Adept at toeing company line
  • Knowledge of the Chicago Manual of Style
  • Self-starter

Applications from within the company will be considered first. Please do not hesitate to contact HR with any questions you might have regarding your qualifications.