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I am extraordinarily tired of this piece of conventional wisdom, contained in today’s New York Times article on presidential hopefuls and Lamont:

Given Mr. Lieberman’s promise to continue caucusing with the Democrats, the outcome will hardly tip the balance of power in the Senate.

Oh please.  When people get cynical about reading newspapers it is because of bullshit like this that only gets peddled for the masses, public kabuki that nobody really believes — behind the scenes I don’t know anyone who doesn’t acknowledge that the deal Lieberman struck with Karl Rove for all his support (Dan Senor, keeping Schlessinger in the race, the services of Rush Limbaugh and the Mighty Wurlizer) has him agreeing to caucus with the GOP if the Senate winds up in a 50/50 tie.  And anyone who doubts him capable of it should only look at the threats he issued to his fellow party members only weeks ago, or the way he punked Harry Reid and Hillary Clinton when he got their endorsements by promising not to leave the party.  Look how well that one worked out.

The article goes on to note that support for Lamont within the party is coming from 2008 hopefuls who don’t want to alienate his grass roots supporters, but that people like Mark Warner are trying to hedge their bets:

Some of the White House hopefuls — most notably Mark R. Warner, the former governor of Virginia — are debating how strongly to align themselves with a candidate who has become an icon of the liberal left.

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At least one candidate, Mr. Warner — who made his fortune in technology and is courting the blogosphere in other ways — has largely avoided Mr. Lamont, instead lending his name and fund-raising capabilities to races that are genuinely in play and have longer-term strategic value for the Democratic Party, like Representative Harold Ford Jr.’s bid for the Senate in Tennessee.

Really?  That was an awfully big show Warner put on at Yearly Kos.   For someone who clearly wants to woo the blogosphere, it seems awfully short-sighted.  In case anyone hasn’t noticed, we care quite a bit about this race, pretty much across the board.

All I can say is — if you don’t want to show up now, that’s fine.  Don’t come begging with your hat in your hand come 2008.